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Transport and Logistics

Overview

This page provides information and data on the Transport and Logistics sector, which is a component of the Transport industry.

The Transport and Logistics sector in Australia has an estimated annual revenue of $101.51 billion, adding $39.91 billion to the Australian economy in 2019-20. The sector employs more than half a million people across its major sub-sectors: Road Transport, Logistics, Warehousing and Stevedoring.

Vocational education and training (VET) is required in the Transport and Logistics sector for occupations such as:

  • Driving Instructors
  • Purchasing and Supply Logistics Clerks
  • Transport and Despatch Clerks
  • Crane, Hoist and Lift Operators
  • Automobile Drivers
  • Delivery Drivers
  • Truck Drivers
  • Storepersons
  • Freight and Furniture Handlers
  • Waterside Worker (Stevedore)
  • Forklift Driver.

Nationally recognised training for the Transport and Logistics sector is delivered under the TLI - Transport and Logistics Training Package.

For information on the Aviation, Maritime, and Rail sectors please visit the respective pages.

All data sources are available at the end of the page.

Employment trends

Employment snapshot

Road Freight Transport is the largest employing sub-sector in the Transport and Logistics sector followed by Postal and Courier Pick-up and Delivery Services, and Road Passenger Transport, with Water Transport Support Services being the smallest. Employment levels at the 3 digit ANZSIC levels related to the Transport and Logistics sector all increased between the years 2001 and 2021, however Water Transport Support Services, Other Transport Support Services and Warehousing and Storage Services decreased between 2020 and 2021. Employment levels are projected to continue increasing until 2025 for all the sub-sectors except Postal and Courier Pick-up and Delivery Services and Water Transport Support Services which are projected to decline.

Truck Drivers, Bus and Coach Drivers and Automobile Drivers made up just under 60% of the Road Transport industry workforce and employment levels in each of these occupations are expected to increase over the until 2025.

Automobile Drivers, and Transport and Despatch Clerks made up 18% and 8% respectively of the combined Transport Support Services (not further defined), Water Transport Support Services and Other Transport Support Services industry workforces. The employment level in both of these occupations is expected to increase until 2025.

Training trends

Training snapshot

There were approximately 50,130 program enrolments in Transport and Logistics-related qualifications during 2020 and 9,450 completions. Both program enrolments and completions decreased significantly overall between 2016 and 2020.

Program enrolments in 2020 were mainly at the certificate III level (80%) with a further 12% at the certificate II level. The main qualification areas were Driving Operations, Supply Chain Operations, and Logistics. The main intended occupations were Truck Driver (General) for Driving Operations qualifications, Storeperson for Supply Chain Operations qualifications, and Despatching and Receiving Clerk for Logistics qualifications.

The majority of training in Transport and Logistics-related qualifications in 2020 were delivered by private training providers (90%) with roughly 6% delivered by TAFE institutes. Nearly 61% of all subjects were Commonwealth and state funded and about 38% were funded via domestic fee for service.

In 2020, students enrolled in this sector were mainly from New South Wales and Victoria at 28% each, followed by Queensland with 21%. Approximately 41% of training was delivered in Victoria, followed by New South Wales (25%) and Queensland (19%).

There was approximately 5,290 apprenticeship and traineeship commencements and roughly 3,590 completions in Transport and Logistics-related qualifications during 2020. Apprenticeship and traineeship commencement and completion numbers have declined substantially since 2013. The highest proportion of apprentices and trainees were training in Supply Chain Operations with the main intended occupation of Storeperson, followed by Driving Operations with the main intended occupation of Truck Driver (General). In 2020, New South Wales reported the highest proportion of apprentices and trainees in training (47%) followed by Queensland (16%) and Victoria (15%).

For more data specific to your occupation, industry group or training package, visit NCVER’s Data Builder.

For more data specific to your region visit NCVER’s Atlas of Total VET.  

If you are interested in extracting NCVER data to construct tables with data relevant to you, sign up for a VOCSTATS account.

Industry insights

Industry insights on skills needs

The Transport and Logistics IRC’s 2019 Skills Forecast identifies the top priority skills in the Transport and Logistics sector as:

  • Health and safety
  • Operational skills
  • Compliance
  • Digital skills.

The top priority industry and occupation skill is driving.

Additionally, the top five generic skills in order of importance are listed as:

  • Language, Literacy and Numeracy (LLN) (Foundation skills) 
  • Managerial / Leadership
  • Technology
  • Learning agility / Information literacy / Intellectual autonomy and self-management (adaptability)
  • Design mindset / Thinking critically / System thinking / Solving problems.

According to the job vacancy data, the top requested skills by employers were communication and planning skills. The most advertised Transport and Logistics occupations were Truck Drivers followed by Bus and Coach Drivers. The top employers for Transport and Logistics workers are Qube Corporation and Linfox.

Transport and Logistics IRC’s 2019 Skills Forecast identifies the following areas as experiencing a skills shortage, with more than 80% of employer respondents reporting a skills shortage in the last 12 months:

  • Heavy vehicle drivers
  • Drivers (general)
  • Educators, trainers and assessors
  • Warehousing
  • Supervisors / managers.

The following were also indicated by employers as reasons for the skills shortages:

  • Ageing workforce / current staff retiring
  • Unattractive job / poor industry image
  • Cost / time to achieve the required qualification
  • Competition from other organisations
  • Wages / salaries considered too low.

Three new industry workforce, skills developments or trends that emerged since the release of the Transport and Logistics IRC’s 2019 Skills Forecast are identified in the Transport and Logistics IRC’s 2020 Skills Forecast (abridged annual update). They relate to new technologies including automated logistics and warehouses, and digital supply chain. Artificial intelligence, machine learning and technologies such as LADAR or Contour Navigation, robotics can minimise labour and optimise warehouse operations. Automated guided vehicles (AGVs) can be used to perform pallet transport, storage and retrieval and drones for stocktaking and inventory management. Internet of Things (IoT) technology is optimising fleet movement, and by combing with data analytics, logistics organisations can create virtual representations of their warehouses. Data analytics and artificial intelligence can assist organisations shift to data driven decision making by predicting orders based on previous customer behaviour, allowing them to determine the logistic services will be needed and the locations they will be required.

Building on the industry workforce, skills developments or trends identified in the previous two years, the Transport and Logistics IRC’s 2021 Industry Outlook (abridged annual update) highlights nine opportunities and challenges for the industry sector under the categories of supply chain, automation and autonomous vehicle technology, new technology and safety, mobile cranes, digital skills, industry-specific cyber security, mental health and fatigue, labour shortages and an ageing workforce, and integrated logistics in relation to naval shipbuilding:

  • The supply chain is diversifying through the use of artificial intelligence, the Internet of Things, blockchain and data analytics to ensure its resilience. As customers use multiple channels for their shopping, omni-channel logistics is growing, and anticipatory logistics is allowing retailers to predict orders.
  • A key challenge will be to upskill existing operators within the supply chain in the operation of semiautonomous and autonomous machines, as well as working in robotic warehouses to minimise workplace displacement.
  • Autonomous vehicles (AVs) technology is increasing, and there are trials of fatigue management technologies being conducted with Transport Certification Australia releasing a protocol setting interoperability requirements for heavy vehicles with different telematics and fatigue management technologies. New South Wales is transitioning its bus fleet to zero emission by implementing electric buses which require specialized training to ensure full benefit of the technology is realised.
  • Crane technologies and operations have undergone significant changes to improve efficiency and safety, and operators need to comply with regulatory requirements.
  • The development of digital skills across the entire transport and logistics workforce will be required due to growth in the use of digital technologies. Consideration will need to be given to the backend of digital systems and networks as well as upskilling the existing workforce, for example drivers, at the front end.
  • The increasing digitalisation of supply chain operations requires workforce skills to be progressively developed to minimise the risk of cyber-attacks and be capable of reinstating digital systems as quickly as possible if a cybersecurity incident occurs, including compliance with regulatory requirements.
  • The issue of mental health in the T&L industry has become more prominent recently and has been exacerbated by the increased workload within some sectors due to COVID-19. The industry needs to continue its focus on mental health issues and raising awareness within workforce. To effectively mitigate the risks associated with mental health, with cohesive and standard policies and regulations need to be introduced across all sectors. The IRC will consider the Cross-Sector Mental Health and Organisational Disruption Skill Set currently being developed by the Business Services IRC.
  • The average age of the transportation workforce is 45 years old, and the average age of a truck driver is 47. The industry is competing with more high profile or fashionable industries for workforce talent. There is a risk the industry will have a workforce supply crisis within the next 10 to 15 years as the older workers retire.
  • There is demand for enhanced technical skills for Integrated Logistics Support (ILS) for the Naval Shipbuilding and Transport and Logistics industries. The Transport and logistics Industry Reference Committee (IRC), on behalf of the Naval Shipbuilding IRC, lead the project to develop seven new Integrated Logistics Support (ILS) Units of Competency and three Skills Sets to meet the requirements of the naval shipbuilding industry.

The Tasmanian Transport and Logistics Industry Workforce Plan 2020-2023 lists a considerable number of workforce challenges including increased competition from other industry sectors for employment opportunities, ageing workforce, poor community understanding of the range of roles available within the sector, limited access to local training and education providers, multiple licensing requirements with underpinning unit of competency pre-requisites, shifting client needs and consumer expectations, emerging technologies, and a multi- layered regulatory environment with a high compliance standard. The plan states the challenges associated with attraction, recruitment, development, and retention of the workforce are compounded by the industry’s operations which can include shift work, long hours, high manual handling, low workforce diversity, increasing digital and literacy demands, and high personal accountability for compliance. With an ageing workforce, there is a high risk vital industry skills and knowledge will be lost.

A view from the top: current workforce challenges in supply chain and logistics identified skills gaps in eight areas and capability gaps in five areas. The skills gaps related to data analytics, truck driving, robotics, cyber security, risk, engineering, customs brokers, and marketing. The capability gaps were in connectedness, or ability to ‘marry’ the different parts of the supply chain, leadership at all levels, problem solving, emotional intelligence, and the ability to meet the challenge of sustainability and ethical demands (ESG). The report states the pace of change due to global influences and new technologies will require the constant upskilling of the workforce. Robotics is already improving the speed and accuracy of routine operations, particularly in warehousing, and there is significant growth in the demand for skills in artificial intelligence and machine learning. Data analytics is enabling businesses to access precise product information which is now key to staying on top of the distribution cycle and to accurately report to consumers the provenance and safety of the products.

The Logistics & Defence Industry Skills Council Road Transport Industry Profiles and Snapshots highlight shortages of Truck Drivers and Mobile Crane operators within the freight sub-sector, and Multi-Purpose Taxi (MPT) Drivers and a lack of driving skills and experience in new Bus Driver recruits for passenger transport. The Skills Priority List includes Truck Driver (General), Furniture Removalist, Tow Truck Driver and Storeperson under occupations not in national shortage, with strong future demand. Production Clerk, Purchasing Officer, Stock Clerk, Warehouse Administrator, Order Clerk, Despatching and Receiving Clerk, and Import-Export Clerk are included under occupations not in national shortage, with moderate future demand.

The wellbeing of truck drivers has been the focus of a research project led by Monash University. Driving Health is funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council, the Transport Workers Union, Linfox and the Centre for Work Health and Safety. The sixth report released is a survey of the physical and mental health of Australian professional drivers. Findings from the survey include that the physical health of truck drivers is poorer than the average for Australians, that 1 in 2 drivers surveyed reported some level of psychological distress, and that the proportion of truck drivers under 35 with severe psychological distress was almost double that of the average for Australian males in the same age bracket. The report also highlights the long hours reported by the survey respondents impact the ability to access fresh food and exercise which are the basis of the prevention of most chronic illnesses, and unpredictable shifts and working through the night create challenges to accessing a health professional.

Links and resources

Below is a list of industry-relevant research, organisations and associations. Hyperlinks have been included where available.

 

IRC and skills forecasts

Transport and Logistics IRC

 

Relevant research

A view from the top: current workforce challenges in supply chain and logistics – Hermione Parsons, Roberto Perez-Franco, Patricia McLean and Jennifer Jones

Driving Health – Monash University

Driving Health Study Report No 6: Survey of The Physical and Mental Health of Australian Professional Drivers –Caryn Van Vreden, Ting Xia, Elizabeth Pritchard, Alex Collie, Sharon Newnam, Shantha M W Rajaratnam, Abilio de Almeida Neto, Ross Iles and Dan I. Lubman

Road Transport Industry Profiles and Snapshots - Logistics & Defence Industry Skills Council (Western Australia)

Skills Priority List - National Skills Commission

Tasmanian Transport and Logistics Industry Workforce Plan 2020-2023 – Tasmanian Transport Association

 

Industry associations

Australasian Convenience and Petroleum Marketers Association

Australian Furniture Removers Association

Australian Logistics Council

Australian Taxi Industry Association

Australian Trucking Association

Bus Industry Confederation

Chartered Institute of Logistics and Transport

Customs Brokers and Forwarders Council of Australia

NT Road Transport Association

Queensland Trucking Association

Supply Chain and Logistics Association of Australia

Victorian Transport Association

Waste, Recycling Industry Association (QLD)

 

Industry advisory bodies

Automotive Training Board – NSW

Industry Skills Advisory Council – NT

Logistics Training Council – WA

 

Licensing / Regulatory

National Heavy Vehicle Regulator

Safe Work Australia

 

Employee associations

Maritime Union of Australia

United Workers Union

Transport Workers Union of Australia

Data sources and notes

Department of Employment 2021, Employment Projections, available from the Labour Market Information Portal

  • by ANZSIC 3 digit industry employment projections to May 2025
    • 461 Road Freight Transport
    • 462 Road Passenger Transport
    • 521 Water Transport Support Services
    • 529 Other Transport Support Services
    • 530 Warehousing and Storage Services
    • 510 Postal and Courier Pick-up and Delivery Services.
  • by ANZSCO, selected occupations, employment projections to May 2025
    • 5912 Transport and Despatch Clerks
    • 7311 Automobile Drivers
    • 7312 Bus and Coach Drivers
    • 7321 Delivery Drivers
    • 7331 Truck Drivers
    • 7411 Storepersons
    • 8911 Freight and Furniture Handlers.

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2021, 6291.0.55.001 - EQ06 - Employed persons by Industry group of main job (ANZSIC), Sex, State and Territory, November 1984 onwards, viewed 1 August 2021 https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/labour/employment-and-unemployment/labour-force-australia-detailed/may-2021

  • Employed total by ANZSIC 3 digit ‘461 Road Freight Transport’, ‘462 Road Passenger Transport’, ‘521 Water Transport Support Services’, ‘529 Other Transport Support Services’, ‘530 Warehousing and Storage Services’ and ‘510 Postal and Courier Pick-up and Delivery Services’, 2001 to 2021, May quarter.

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2017, 2016 Census – employment, income and unpaid work, TableBuilder. Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data.

  • Employment level by 2 digit Road Transport industry, and 3 digit Transport Support Services, nfd; Water Transport Support Services; and Other Transport Support Services and 4 digit level occupations to identify the relevant VET-related occupations in the industry as a proportion of the total workforce.

Training data has been extracted from the National VET Provider Collection, Total VET Students and Courses from the following training package or qualifications:

  • TLI Transport and Logistics Training Package.
  • Driving Instruction
    • TLI41210 - Certificate IV in Transport and Logistics (Road Transport - Car Driving Instruction)
    • TLI41216 - Certificate IV in Transport and Logistics (Road Transport - Car Driving Instruction)
    • TLI41218 - Certificate IV in Transport and Logistics (Road Transport - Car Driving Instruction)
    • TLI41310 - Certificate IV in Transport and Logistics (Road Transport - Heavy Vehicle Driving Instruction)
    • TLI41316 - Certificate IV in Transport and Logistics (Road Transport - Heavy Vehicle Driving Instruction)
    • TLI41318 - Certificate IV in Transport and Logistics (Road Transport - Heavy Vehicle Driving Instruction)
    • TLI41410 - Certificate IV in Transport and Logistics (Road Transport - Motorcycle Riding Instruction)
    • TLI41416 - Certificate IV in Transport and Logistics (Road Transport - Motorcycle Riding Instruction)
    • TLI41418 - Certificate IV in Transport and Logistics (Road Transport - Motorcycle Riding Instruction).
  • Driving Operations
    • TLI21209 - Certificate II in Driving Operations
    • TLI21210 - Certificate II in Driving Operations
    • TLI21216 - Certificate II in Driving Operations
    • TLI30207 - Certificate III in Transport and Logistics (Road Transport)
    • TLI31209 - Certificate III in Driving Operations
    • TLI31210 - Certificate III in Driving Operations
    • TLI31216 - Certificate III in Driving Operations
    • TLI33413 - Certificate III in Waste Driving Operations
    • TLI33416 - Certificate III in Waste Driving Operations
    • TLI33418 - Certificate III in Waste Driving Operations
    • TLI40519 - Certificate IV in Traffic Control Room Operations
    • TLI42111 - Certificate IV in Driving Operations
    • TLI42116 - Certificate IV in Driving Operations
    • TLI50716 - Diploma of Bus and Coach Operations.
  • International Freight Forwarding/Customs Broking
    • TLI30119 - Certificate III in International Freight Forwarding (Operator)
    • TLI31310 - Certificate III in International Freight Forwarding (Operator)
    • TLI31316 - Certificate III in International Freight Forwarding (Operator)
    • TLI31320 - Certificate III in International Freight Forwarding (Operator)
    • TLI40219 - Certificate IV in International Freight Forwarding (Senior Operator)
    • TLI41610 - Certificate IV in International Freight Forwarding (Senior Operator)
    • TLI41616 - Certificate IV in International Freight Forwarding (Senior Operator)
    • TLI50119 - Diploma of International Freight Forwarding
    • TLI50310 - Diploma of International Freight Forwarding
    • TLI50316 - Diploma of International Freight Forwarding
    • TLI50813 - Diploma of Customs Broking
    • TLI50816 - Diploma of Customs Broking.
  • Logistics
    • TLI11310 - Certificate I in Logistics
    • TLI11315 - Certificate I in Logistics
    • TLI20119 - Certificate II in Logistics
    • TLI21810 - Certificate II in Logistics
    • TLI21815 - Certificate II in Logistics
    • TLI32410 - Certificate III in Logistics
    • TLI32416 - Certificate III in Logistics
    • TLI40118 - Certificate IV in Transport Scheduling
    • TLI40319 - Certificate IV in Logistics
    • TLI41515 - Certificate IV in Materiel Logistics
    • TLI42010 - Certificate IV in Logistics
    • TLI42016 - Certificate IV in Logistics
    • TLI50107 - Diploma of Logistics
    • TLI50210 - Diploma of Materiel Logistics
    • TLI50215 - Diploma of Materiel Logistics
    • TLI50219 - Diploma of Logistics
    • TLI50410 - Diploma of Logistics
    • TLI50415 - Diploma of Logistics
    • TLI50420 - Diploma of Materiel Logistics
    • TLI60110 - Advanced Diploma of Materiel Logistics
    • TLI60115 - Advanced Diploma of Materiel Logistics
    • TLI60119 - Advanced Diploma of Deployment Logistics
    • TLI60210 - Advanced Diploma of Deployment Logistics
    • TLI60215 - Advanced Diploma of Deployment Logistics.
  • Other
    • TLI10115 - Certificate I in Transport and Logistics (Pathways)
    • TLI22413 - Certificate II in Furniture Removal
    • TLI22416 - Certificate II in Furniture Removal
    • TLI22418 - Certificate II in Furniture Removal
    • TLI33313 - Certificate III in Furniture Removal
    • TLI33316 - Certificate III in Furniture Removal
    • TLI42513 - Certificate IV in Traffic Operations
    • TLI42516 - Certificate IV in Traffic Operations
    • TLIPC110 - Certificate I in Transport and Logistics (Pathways).
  • Ports
    • TLI20319 - Certificate II in Stevedoring
    • TLI21413 - Certificate II in Stevedoring
    • TLI21416 - Certificate II in Stevedoring
    • TLI30118 - Certificate III in Mobile Crane Operations
    • TLI30907 - Certificate III in Transport and Logistics (Mobile Cranes Operations)
    • TLI31510 - Certificate III in Stevedoring
    • TLI31710 - Certificate III in Mobile Crane Operations
    • TLI31716 - Certificate III in Mobile Crane Operations
    • TLI31718 - Certificate III in Mobile Crane Operations
    • TLI33513 - Certificate III in Stevedoring
    • TLI33516 - Certificate III in Stevedoring
    • TLI33518 - Certificate III in Stevedoring
    • TLI40218 - Certificate IV in Mobile Crane Operations
    • TLI41710 - Certificate IV in Stevedoring Operations
    • TLI41910 - Certificate IV in Mobile Crane Operations
    • TLI41916 - Certificate IV in Mobile Crane Operations
    • TLI41918 - Certificate IV in Mobile Crane Operations.
  • Road Transport Yard Operations
    • TDT10202 - Certificate I in Transport and Distribution (Road Transport)
    • TDT20202 - Certificate II in Transport and Distribution (Road Transport)
    • TLI20118 - Certificate II in Road Transport Terminal Operations
    • TLI21710 - Certificate II in Road Transport Yard Operations (Freight Handler)
    • TLI21716 - Certificate II in Road Transport Yard Operations (Freight Handler).
  • Supply Chain Operations
    • TLI20420 - Certificate II in Supply Chain Operations
    • TLI21107 - Certificate II in Transport and Logistics (Logistics Operations)
    • TLI21610 - Certificate II in Warehousing Operations
    • TLI21616 - Certificate II in Warehousing Operations
    • TLI30107 - Certificate III in Transport and Logistics (Warehousing and Storage)
    • TLI30319 - Certificate III in Supply Chain Operations
    • TLI31107 - Certificate III in Transport and Logistics (Logistics Operations)
    • TLI31610 - Certificate III in Warehousing Operations
    • TLI31616 - Certificate III in Warehousing Operations.
  • Warehousing Operations
    • TDT20102 - Certificate II in Transport and Distribution (Warehousing and Storage)
    • TLI10107 - Certificate I in Transport and Logistics (Warehousing and Storage)
    • TLI11210 - Certificate I in Warehousing Operations
    • TLI11215 - Certificate I in Warehousing Operations
    • TLI20107 - Certificate II in Transport and Logistics (Warehousing and Storage)
    • TLI20419 - Certificate II in Warehousing Operations
    • TLI40107 - Certificate IV in Transport and Logistics (Warehousing and Storage)
    • TLI40619 - Certificate IV in Warehousing Operations
    • TLI41810 - Certificate IV in Warehousing Operations
    • TLI41816 - Certificate IV in Warehousing Operations.

This includes superseded qualifications and training packages.

Data covers a range of selected student and training characteristics in the following categories and years:

  • 2016 to 2020 program enrolments
  • 2016 to 2020 subject enrolments
  • 2016 to 2020 program completions.

Total VET students and courses data is reported for the calendar year. Program enrolments are the qualifications, courses and skill-sets in which students are enrolled in a given period. For students enrolled in multiple programs, all programs are counted.  Program completion indicates that a student has completed a structured and integrated program of education or training. Location data uses student residence.  Subject enrolment is registration of a student at a training delivery location for the purpose of undertaking a module, unit of competency or subject. For more information on the terms and definitions, please refer to the Total VET students and courses: terms and definitions document.

Low counts (less than 5) are not reported to protect client confidentiality.

Percentages are rounded to one decimal place. This can lead to situations where the total sum of proportions in a chart may not add up to exactly 100%.

TLI Transport and Logistics apprentice and trainee data has been extracted from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection, including:

  • 2011 to 2020 commencements
  • 2011 to 2020 completions
  • apprentices and trainees in-training October to December 2020 collection, by qualification and state and territory of data submitter.

Job vacancy data have been extracted from Burning Glass Technologies 2021, Labor Insight Real-time Labor Market Information Tool, Burning Glass Technologies, Boston, viewed July 2021, https://www.burning-glass.com.

Data shown represent most requested generic skills, occupations and employers according to internet job postings in Australia between July 2018 and June 2021 filtered by ANZSIC and ANZSCO classification levels listed below.

  • Generic Skills/Occupations
    • ANZSCO major groups excluding 5220 Airport Operations and Other Air Transport Support Services, Community and Personal Service Workers, Managers, Professionals, Sales Workers
    • 52 Transport Support Services
    • 53 Warehousing and Storage Services
    • 46 Road Transport.
  • Employers
    • 7312 Bus and Coach Drivers
    • 7331 Truck Drivers
    • 7311 Automobile Drivers
    • 5111 Contract, Program and Project Administrators
    • 3212 Motor Mechanics
    • 52 Transport Support Services
    • 53 Warehousing and Storage Services
    • 46 Road Transport
    • And excluding 5220 Airport Operations and Other Air Transport Support Services.
Updated: 19 Jan 2022
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