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Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure

Overview

This page provides high-level information on the Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure industry which comprises five main industry sectors:

  • Civil Infrastructure.
  • Coal Mining
  • Drilling
  • Extractive Industries (Quarrying)
  • Metalliferous Mining.

Historically, the mining of resources has been important to Australia’s wealth and prosperity, a trend that continues to the present day. Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure combined, makes up a significant part of Australia’s economy, contributing around $248 billion during 2018 and employing over 350,000 people in 2018. The locations of Coal Mining, Drilling and Metalliferous Mining activities are dependent on where deposits of these resources are discovered. Civil Infrastructure and Extractive Industries activity tends to be concentrated around areas of major development and large infrastructure projects.

Nationally recognised training for Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure occupations is delivered under the RII – Resources and Infrastructure Industry Training Package.

For more information and data specific to Civil Infrastructure, Coal Mining, Drilling, Extractive Industries, and Metalliferous Mining please visit the respective pages.

For information and data on training qualifications that apply to multiple sectors within the Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure industry please visit the Resources and Infrastructure Cross Sector page.

Information sourced from the most recently available Skills Forecast, the Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast.

IRC and skills forecasts

The Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure IRC was not required to submit an annual update to their 2019 Skills Forecast during 2020. As such, the version published in 2019 remains the most recently published Skills Forecast for this industry.

Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure IRC’s

Industry cluster snapshot

Please note: any employment projections outlined below were calculated by the Australian Bureau of Statistics prior to COVID-19.

Employment and training snapshot

Employment levels in the Mining, and Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction industry sectors rose significantly in the period between 2007 and 2014 reflecting labour demand created by the resources boom. Employment levels have since declined from their peaks however the industry sectors Coal Mining, Metal Ore Mining and Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction have risen overall between 2015 and 2020. Employment levels are projected to increase by 2024 in all sectors except for Exploration and Other Mining Support Services which shows a slight decrease.

There were approximately 66,180 program enrolments in the Resources and Infrastructure Industry Training Package during 2019, and 11,240 completions. Both program enrolments and completions declined between 2015 and 2019. The proportion of subjects delivered as part of a nationally recognised program has declined steadily from nearly 60% in 2015 to just over 40% in 2019.There are a high proportion of common skills shared between the different sectors in the Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure industry. For example, Drilling is a multidisciplinary sector and shares many core skills with the other sectors within the industry. The Coal Mining, Extractive Industries, and Metalliferous Mining sectors also share sets of common skills.

For more data specific to your occupation, industry or training package, visit NCVER’s VET students by industry. If you are prompted to log in, select cancel and you will continue to be directed to the program.

For more data specific to your region visit NCVER’s Atlas of Total VET.

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Industry insights on skills needs

The Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast identifies three key drivers that will influence the future skills required by the Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure industry workforce.

  • A steady economic environment: Global demand for resources continues, and there are high levels of State and Federal investment in large civil infrastructure projects, particularly in road and rail with the Australian Infrastructure Audit 2019 showing there was $130 billion of transport infrastructure projects under construction in 2018.
  • Changing technology: As the uptake of automation, digital technologies and prefabrication increase, advanced digital and cognitive skills are becoming more valuable and enabling the ability to adjust to new ways of working in the sector.
  • Safety and risk management: Heightened focus on safety and environmental threats is demanding increased awareness of and responsibility for business risks. Nano-diesel particulate matter (nDPM) control, fatigue management and the increasing importance of a social licence to operate are redefining how and which kinds of businesses firms operate.

As Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast reports, there is a need for tailored training to enable individuals entering the resources sector from another industry to reskill and increased focus on skills that are transferable across sectors. A report for the Minerals Council of Australia by EY, The Future of Work: The Changing Skills Landscape for Miners, highlights the tendency to reduce the workforce in response to economic downturns results in a loss of relevant skills, subject-matter expertise and sector-wide experience that is costly to remedy in subsequent upturns. In Staying Ahead of the Game, a report produced by AlphaBeta for the METS Ignited and NERA Industry Growth Centres that highlights 30 use cases of automation technologies that are most relevant for the resources industries, step 4 of their proposed roadmap is boosting skills and research and development. The report proposes an intensified effort on behalf of industry, education providers and governments to build a pipeline of talent to meet the rising demand for skills and transition the current workforce into that of the future, and the development of new cross-industry and cross-community training programmes in data analytics, automation and robotics.

The Resource Industry Training Council’s (RITCWA) 2020 Mining/Oil and Gas Industry Snapshot reports a number of skills shortages within the resources sector, with strong demand for RC drillers, diamond drillers, field assistants, drill and blast operators, auto electricians, surface mining plant operators (load and haul) and heavy-duty diesel fitters. Exploration, blast hole, oil and gas, geotechnical and water well industry sectors report impacts through a lack of skilled drillers and offsiders. Many skilled workers left the industry during the last downturn, it is difficult to recruit new entrants due to the remote and difficult working conditions, and around half of new entrants leave within the first twelve months. Diesel fitters were also identified as critical to achieving industry growth potential in the Construction, Mining and Energy Workforce Insights produced by the Training and Skills Commission (South Australia), along with Mining Engineers, Occupational Hygienists and Surveyors. The companion document to the Tasmanian Mining Industry Workforce Development Plan 2019-2022: Final Report found the top five workforce challenges facing the mining industry in Tasmania are: recruiting new workforce entrants, an ageing workforce, low workforce literacy and numeracy skills, accessing training that fits your business model, retaining corporate knowledge. The final report states competition from the Battery of the Nation and Project Marinus major projects will likely impact the industry’s ability to grow its workforce and immediate priorities include developing initiatives that will attract workers and job readiness training that can be undertaken before entering mining sites.

The adoption of automated technology is a recurring theme in the literature for the Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure industries. A Robotics Roadmap for Australia by the Australian Centre for Robotic Vision predicts the greatest ongoing impact for robotics in the resources sector is in the actual mining process (drill/blast/load/haul) and comminution (breaking of rocks). For infrastructure, the Roadmap anticipates an increase in the usage of smart technologies and robotics in inspection, quality control and maintenance, particularly in hostile environments, and remote or extensive infrastructure. The 2020 Mining/Oil and Gas Industry Snapshot states relatively few resources sector job roles will be heavily impacted, for example haul truck drivers, with automation mainly occurring at the task level and there will be an increase in cross-skilling or hybridization of roles. The snapshot reports companies are working to formally recognise the skills held by affected workers and providing opportunities to upskill to take on different roles. Industry is finding the training products are not evolving quickly enough and the existing workforce is being upskilled for automation through just-in-time learning, micro-credentials or skills sets internally in collaboration with technology suppliers, challenging existing delivery paradigms which are still largely based at the full qualification level. The Report on the Review of Skills, Training and Workforce Development states new technologies are constantly changing core trades and many sectors including resource, agriculture, defence and civil construction require highly skilled individuals with skills crossing two or more traditional trades indicating hybrid trades are needed as well as the up-skilling of existing workers. The Future of Work: The Changing Skills Landscape for Miners predicts robotics and automation will require greater skills in data and digital technologies for occupations including drill operators, surveyors and field geologists and increase demand for remote vehicle operators.

In November 2019, the Western Australian Government announced a Certificate IV in Autonomous Control and Remote Operations, Certificate II in Autonomous Workplace Operations and a micro-credential course for apprentices and technicians had been developed through the Resource Industry Collaboration, a partnership between the Western Australian Government, SMTAFE and Rio Tinto Iron Ore, to provide pathways to emerging jobs in the field of automation. BHP Mitsubishi Alliance (BMA) in partnership with TAFE Queensland and CQ University is also developing autonomous qualifications for the resources sector through its Queensland Future Skills partnership. BMA announced in July it would be introducing 34 autonomous trucks in their operations in regional Queensland, creating more than 150 project-related jobs and 56 permanent positions, with no loss of current employees.

PwC’s Mine 2019: Resourcing the Future reports that safety remains a challenge for the mining industry, however using technology and automation may assist reducing the risks of injury to workers. The findings of a case study analysis conducted by EY for the Minerals Council of Australia concur. The Future of Work: the Economic Implications of Technology and Digital Mining report states advancements in automation and remote operations can provide improvements to firstly workforce health and wellbeing by shifting the type and severity of risks they are exposed to, and secondly to environmental management through reductions in the overall environmental footprint and lower greenhouse gas emissions. The 2020 Mining/Oil and Gas Industry Snapshot lists examples of technology recently introduced to mining in Western Australia that while improving performance and safety will have a skills impact. The examples are: software for mine planning and enterprise optimisation; pedestrian proximity detection systems interlocked with underground continuous mining machines; automatic face alignment and horizon control of underground coal longwall equipment; automatic cutting cycles of continuous mining machines; automation of swing, dump and return phases of the shovel loading cycle; automated drilling systems and automated haul trucks at surface mines; and automated haulage in underground metal mines. However, the Review of all fatal accidents in Queensland mines and quarries from 2000 to 2019 [Brady Review] found the causes of fatalities are typically a combination of a failure of controls, a lack of training, and/or absent or inadequate supervision, emphasising the importance of workers being skilled or upskilled for the tasks they are required to perform. The Mine 2019: Resourcing the Future report also suggests the industry should address the awareness gap between 'the brand of mining' and 'the benefits of mining'. Mining produces the raw materials for many essential products that people rely on and the industry needs to engage the younger generation who represent the future workforce. This is supported by the Australian Centre for Robotic Vision National Roadmap that states social licence to operate has become more important in the resource sector, and there is an imperative to engage with the community over contentious issues such as robotics in the workforce.

The 2020 Mining/Oil and Gas Industry Snapshot finds there has been a surge in exploration activity for lithium in Western Australia. Australia has 30% of the world’s lithium reserves and is the largest exporter, producing 55% of global lithium in 2019. The Western Australian Government established a lithium Taskforce in 2018 and released the Western Australian Future Battery Industry Strategy in January 2019. The WA Government has provided funding for the Future Battery Industries Cooperative Research Centre (FBICRC) in Perth. A project to identify skills gaps and develop a workforce development strategy is being undertaken by South Metropolitan TAFE, an associate member of the FBICRC. The Commonwealth Government released Australia’s Critical Minerals Strategy in March 2019. At the COAG Energy Council National Resources meeting of 16 April 2020, the ministers endorsed the Onshore Gas Principles Guide and a COAG Critical Minerals Work Plan. The Commonwealth Government’s Critical Minerals Facilitation Office will oversee and coordinate the ongoing development and implementation of the COAG Critical Minerals work plan.

COVID-19 impact

Civil Infrastructure

The Civil Infrastructure sector continues to operate during the COVID-19 outbreak. The sector incorporates all civic and industrial infrastructure works, excluding the erection of buildings. The sector’s activities include road construction, plant operation, pipeline construction, trenchless technology, bridge construction, rail construction and tunnelling. The Civil Contractors Federation National COVID-19 Member Survey report states the results of the survey conducted in early April indicate that more than 80% of respondent businesses have experienced a minor or moderate impact reinforcing that the industry at large is in a strong position and remains ‘open for business’. Respondents indicated business impact is largely due to four main interruptions: supply chain, travel restrictions, lack of work opportunities and client direction. Respondents also indicated that in addition to being able to tender for new work, an overwhelming majority of companies would also employ additional workers when the Government provides additional project funding.

Roads Australia has conducted three surveys to date. Results from the first survey conducted in March indicated the sector was already being affected by the pandemic. The infrastructure sector was largely operating at 86 per cent of its capacity in the two weeks prior to the survey. Organisations were having difficulty with the availability of staff, sub-contractors and equipment. Respondents also nominated border and travel restrictions which had stopped the transfer of interstate and overseas staff to key projects, unavailability of clients and key personnel to provide direction and sign-off on approvals, loss of current and future revenue, unavailability of COVID-19 preventative supplies, such as sanitisers, and basic worksite staples such as toilet paper. The sector must adhere to strict physical distancing on worksites, resulting in slower progress. The second survey found while respondents were mainly experiencing minor delays in progress, there was concern clients may enforce contract terms without allowances for delays caused by the pandemic. The third survey indicates most respondents were still only experiencing minor delays in progress, however less than half indicated they had seen an increased willingness to be more flexible on time and cost variations. On the question of ‘where should governments be focusing their attention right now’ the option ‘continue expediting projects to market’ received the highest score.

A large proportion of the Commonwealth, state and territory economic recovery planning has initially been focused on the infrastructure sector. In the Prime Minister’s address to the CEDA’s State of the Nation Conference on 15 June 2020, $1 billion was committed for small priority projects identified by the states and the territories and $500 million for road safety works to supplement the $7.8 billion of infrastructure spending brought forward that was announced in November 2019. Media releases from the Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development in late June suggest the states and territories will be commencing projects with a total value of nearly $2.4 billion. NBN Co has also announced it will bringing forward the next phase of planned network investment, which will enable customers connected to Fibre-to-the-Node (FTTN), Fibre-to-the-Curb (FTTC) and Hybrid-Fibre-Coaxial (HFC) networks access to the higher peak wholesale speed tiers of the Fibre-to-the-Premises (FTTP) technology. Their 2021 corporate plan also includes the creation of up to 240 nbn Business Fibre Zones, delivering the necessary fibre infrastructure to support Enterprise Ethernet, and working with local councils and state and territory governments to identify opportunities to extend business-grade services outside of designated nbn Business Fibre Zones. The announcement states economics firm AlphaBeta estimates the stimulus package has the potential to add more than $6.4 billion to the annual GDP from 2024 and create an additional 25,000 direct, indirect and induced jobs over the next two years.

Mining Industry

Mining operations have continued during the COVID-19 outbreak. At the federal and state resources ministers meeting on Tuesday 24 March 2020, the ministers discussed the need for a coordinated national approach to managing the impacts of COVID-19 in the resources sector, and agreed that the sector is essential in maintaining a strong Australian economy. Mining was deemed an essential service allowing the industry to continue operations. However, the industry has had to contend with numerous challenges, including:

  • Australia closed its borders to non-citizens and non-residents on 20 March 2020, requires exemptions to be obtained for the travel of essential workers and 14 day quarantines for overseas arrivals, affecting multinational companies with global workforces.
  • The industry operates in remote or regional areas, and many of its employees are large fly-in, fly-out (FIFO) workers. A range of internal border restrictions have been implemented by the states and territories that have been varied at short notice to accommodate rapid changes in jurisdictional circumstances. The Northern Territory, Western Australia, South Australia and Queensland also restricted travel to indigenous communities.
  • Without the continued level of business and tourism travel, companies operating in the commercial aviation industry have had to severely reduce their services.
  • Mining sites include accommodation and food service areas.
  • The pandemic has disrupted global supply chains, and there was a risk companies would not be able to acquire crucial services and supplies to sustain health and safety requirements and continued operations.

The Resources sector –National COVID-19 Protocols, written in consultation with all peak state and territory representative mining bodies and with the cooperation of the Australian Petroleum Production and Exploration Association, were released in March. The protocols cover: primary health and safety advice, education and communication, families and mental health; travel and accommodation, safety at work, in the event of an incident, critical suppliers and contractors, and Indigenous communities. There is also a ‘Supporting guide for engaging with remote Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities’, which is updated to reflect changes in circumstances when they occur. The Resources Industry Training Council (RITCWA) 2020 Mining/Oil and Gas Industry Snapshot states Western Australia’s resources sector has implemented strict protocols to ensure the safety of its workforce and the communities in which the industry operates. The protocols include minimising the movement of people to sites, requiring the lengthening of rosters across the sector and deferral of non-essential maintenance activities. Many companies moved critical workers based in other states into Western Australia when border restrictions were enacted by the Western Australian Government. BHP also reports introducing flexible shift and rostering arrangements, and working with people to relocate temporarily to comply with cross-border restrictions and quarantine requirements. In the same media release, BHP lists the numerous measures introduced to their work sites in line with the national protocols. In Queensland, BHP Mitsubishi Alliance (BMA) announced it would only use charter flights to transport FIFO employees and contractors and restrict non-residential workers from visiting townships near its mine sites to protect local communities. PwC’s Global Mine Report 2020 highlights the alternative workforce delivery models, including remote working and roster changes, Rio Tinto implemented have resulted in unexpected productivity gains and potentially will make them permanent.

PwC’s Global Mine Report 2020 also states global supply chains and transient workforces have been highly effective in keeping the costs of mining down, however when the pandemic closed borders and factories, miners heavily reliant on this model found the situation the most difficult. The report highlights several of the global top 40 mining companies have announced initiatives to increase support for their local suppliers. The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) granted interim authorisation for members of the Minerals Council of Australia (MCA) and other mining associations to work together on the sourcing, purchase and distribution of crucial supplies and services such as health and safety equipment, logistics, equipment maintenance and consumables like fuel and explosives during the COVID 19 pandemic. On its Resources for managing COVID-19 page, the MCA has provided a guide to managing supply risks, a list of critical health products suppliers, and links to a portal provided by the Industry Capability Network (ICN) where suppliers can register their interest to provide key goods and services. BHP has partnered with Austmine to launch the BHP Supplier Innovation Program across Australia. The program will consist of a series of events that showcase BHP business problems to mining equipment, technology and services (METS) sector participants, and inviting their participation in workshops to develop solutions to these challenges.

The Mining, Drilling and Civil Infrastructure IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast identifies community perception of the industry as an important influence on how mining companies operate. The Global Mine Report 2020 report highlights mining’s social licence to operate has never been more critical as companies seek to utilise skills and resources from their local communities. Large mining companies have been building resilience through training, infrastructure and assistance, continuing to pay people unable to work, and helping local people with logistics and medical equipment. Mining companies in Australia have been very proactive in assisting their communities, establishing community funds and providing business and logistical support. The following is a small sample of the assistance announced by the Australian mining companies listed in the report:

  • As part of its community strategy, BHP reports its supply chain is also supplying food supplies to childcare centres, school canteens and not for profit organisations, supporting local Aboriginal organisations and services to assist people to return to remote communities, and working with those communities and government to ensure people have what they need to stay in their communities. Fortescue has donated non-perishable food and critical hygiene products and is ensuring Aboriginal businesses that form part of its supply chain remain resilient during the outbreak.
  • Rio Tinto reports it is manufacturing hand sanitiser, to giving protective equipment to hospitals and funding local response initiatives. Newcrest has supplied protective equipment and supported the development of low cost locally made ventilators. South 32 has established a new medical clinic on Groote Eylandt.
  • BHP, Rio Tinto and Fortescue have pledged funds to support aeromedical care and health care services in the communities in which they operate. Newcrest reports it is one of 20 companies to donate a total of $6.6 million to Foodbank, RFDS, and Lifeline. South 32 was another of these companies. Newcrest have also supported community meal providers in Melbourne.
  • Rio Tinto has donated to the Murdoch Children’s Research Institute (MCRI) COVID Immune research program to investigate COVID-19 effects on children’s immune systems, and Newcrest is supporting the University of Queensland’s vaccine research.
  • Internationally, Australia’s largest mining companies have supported local communities with health care, quarantine and testing facilities, hygiene products, personal protective equipment, clean water and meals.

RITCWA reports a number of mining companies and contractors servicing the industry continue to report a tightening of the skilled labour market for trades, particularly for experienced heavy-duty diesel fitters/mechanics, and that the Hays Jobs Report for resources and mining additionally indicates strong demand for RC drillers, diamond drillers, field assistants, drill and blast operators, auto electricians, and surface mining plant operators (load and haul). The resources industry in Western Australia is moving into a growth phase with new project activity and the expansion of existing mines, and continuing border restrictions are expected to intensify the demand for skilled workers, particularly as this demand has been largely unaffected by the pandemic. Modelling undertaken on RITCWA’s behalf shows in peak recovery (December 2020/January 2021) an additional 8,049 workers will be required which includes 2,647 tradespeople, 2,565 machinery operators and drivers; and 997 labourers. Skills shortages may be further exacerbated by state and Commonwealth Government infrastructure spending to stimulate job creation as a COVID recovery strategy.

The Minerals Council of Australia and CoverCard Mining Job Advertisement Analysis found Queensland and Western Australian mining job advertisements increased in the March to May period. The key findings of the analysis suggest changes to roster and travel arrangements may have created a requirement for more FIFO workers from within certain states, with the increase also potentially linked to a greater share of ads for trades and skilled workers versus ads for professionals. BHP announced in March it would be hiring an additional 1,500 people to support its operations, with roles including machinery and production operators, truck and ancillary equipment drivers, excavator operators, diesel mechanics boilermakers, trades assistants, electricians, cleaners and warehousing. In May, the Western Australian Government announced Rio Tinto in partnership with South Metropolitan TAFE (SM TAFE) will cover course fees for up to 200 apprentices displaced by the outbreak to complete the recently accredited automation micro-credential course developed by the Resource Industry Collaboration, led by Rio Tinto, the Western Australian Government and SM TAFE. Rio Tinto has also approved a further $50,000 for another 200 apprentices at TAFEs in regional WA the near future.

Links and resources

Below is a list of industry-relevant research, organisations and associations. Hyperlinks have been included where available.

 

Relevant research

2020 Mining/Oil and Gas Industry Snapshot – Resource Industry Training Council (RITCWA)

A Robotics Roadmap for Australia – Australian Centre for Robotic Vision

Construction, Mining and Energy Workforce Insights – Training and Skills Commission (TASC)

Future of Work: The Economic Implications of Technology and Digital Mining – Ernst & Young Australia

Report on the Review of Skills, Training and Workforce Development – Anne Driscoll, Michelle Hoad and Terry Durant

Mine 2019: Resourcing the Future – PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)

Review of all fatal accidents in Queensland mines and quarries from 2000 to 2019 [Brady Review] – Sean Brady; Queensland Government

Staying Ahead of the Game – AlphaBeta; METS Ignited and NERA

Tasmanian Mining Industry Workforce Development Plan 2019-2022: Final Report – Stenning & Associates and The Work Lab; Skills Tasmania

Tasmanian Mining Industry Workforce Profile and Emerging Challenges: Companion Document to Final Report – Stenning & Associates; Skills Tasmania

The Future of Work: The Changing Skills Landscape for Miners – Ernst & Young Australia

 

COVID-19 References

$1 billion to unlock thousands of infrastructure jobs in NSW – Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development media release

$145 million to unlock infrastructure jobs in SA – Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development media release

$223 million to unlock hundreds of local infrastructure jobs – Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development media release

$35 million to unlock infrastructure jobs in the ACT – Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development media release

$415 million to unlock hundreds of infrastructure jobs in Queensland – Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development media release

$46 million to unlock infrastructure jobs in Tasmania – Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development media release

$53 million to unlock infrastructure jobs in the NT – Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development media release

2020 Mining/Oil and Gas Industry Snapshot – Resources Industry Training Council (RITCWA)

Address – CEDA’s State of the Nation Conference, 15 June 2020 – Prime Minister of Australia

Apprentices to benefit from TAFE partnership with Rio Tinto – Government of Western Australia, 14 May 2020

BHP continues to implement measures to reduce COVID-19 risks to workforce and communities- BHP media release, 26 March 2020

BHP to hire 1500 to support operations and the economy – BHP media release, 20 March 2020

BMA working to reduce the spread and protect Queenslanders – BHP media release, 03 April 2020

Civil Contractors Federation National COVID-19 Member Survey - Civil Contractors Federation (CCF)

Civil Contractors Federation National COVID-19 Member Survey – Civil Contractors Federation (CCF)

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Update - Fortescue Metals Group Ltd

COVID-19 – Newcrest Mining Limited

COVID-19 Response – Rio Tinto

Funding flows to local roads and community infrastructure – Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development media release

Impacts of COVID-19 on the infrastructure sector – Infrastructure Magazine

Infrastructure for Australia's future – Infrastructure Australia, 30 April 2020

Infrastructure Priority List – Infrastructure Australia

Initial build complete, NBN Co announces next phase of network investment to meet future demand- NBN Co, 23 September 2020

Mine 2020: Resilient and Resourceful – PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC)

Minerals Council of Australia and CoverCard Mining Job Advertisement Analysis–Model Outputs and Key Insights forMarch2020 to May2020 – Matt Tomlins; CoverCard

Mining Companies Allowed to Co-operate During COVID-19 Pandemic – Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC)

More than half a billion dollars to unlock infrastructure jobs in Victoria – Minister for Infrastructure, Transport and Regional Development media release

National Coordination Mechanism – Australian Government Department of Home Affairs

National Resources Ministers: Meeting Communique – COAG Energy Council/Resources Sector National Coordination Mechanism, 25th March 2020

Resources sector –National COVID-19 Protocols – Minerals Council of Australia (MCA)

Supporting our Communities during the COVID-19 Pandemic – South 32

 

Regulatory bodies

Australian Explosives Industry and Safety Group (AEISG)

Northern Territory Department of Primary Industry & Resources

NSW Department of Industry - Resources Regulator

Northern Territory Department of Environment and Natural Resources

Queensland Department of Natural Resources, Mines and Energy

South Australian Department of Environment, Water and Natural Resources

South Australian Department of Primary Industries and Regions (PIRSA)

Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment

Tasmanian Department of State Growth

Victorian Department of Environment, Land, Water and Planning

Victorian Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions

Western Australian Department of Water and Environmental Regulation

Water NSW

 

Safety regulators

Access Canberra

NT WorkSafe

Safe Work Australia

SafeWork SA

SafeWork NSW

WorkCover Queensland

WorkSafe Tasmania

WorkSafe Victoria

WorkSafe Western Australia

 

Industry associations and advisory bodies

Civil Infrastructure

Australasian Society for Trenchless Technology (ASTT)

Australian Asphalt Pavement Association (AAPA)

Australian Constructors Association (ACA)

Austroads

Auststab

Civil Contractors Federation (CCF)

Construction & Mining Equipment Industry Group (CMEIG)

Construction Skills QLD

Dial Before You Dig

Engineers Australia

Institute of Public Works Engineering Australasia (IPWEA)

Roads Australia

Traffic Management Association of Australia (TMAA)

 

Coal Mining

Australian Mines and Metals Association (AMMA)

Australian Mining Association (AMA)

Coal Services

Mine Managers Association of Australia (MMAA)

Minerals Council of Australia (MCA)

Mines Rescue

NSW Mining and Petroleum Competence Board

Queensland Coal Mining Safety and Health Advisory Committee (CMSHAC)

 

Drilling

Australasian Society for Trenchless Technology (ASTT)

Australian Drilling Industry Association (ADIA)

International Association of Drilling Contractors (IADC)

National Uniform Driller Licensing Committee (NUDLC)

NSW Mining and Petroleum Competence Board

Piling and Foundation Specialists Federation (PFSF)

 

Extractive Industries (Quarrying)

Australian Asphalt Pavement Association (AAPA)

Cement Concrete and Aggregates Australia (CCAA)

Construction Material Processors Association (CMPA)

Institute of Quarrying Australia (IQA)

NSW Mining and Petroleum Competence Board

Victorian Limestone Producers Association (VLPA)

 

Metalliferous Mining

Australian Mines and Metals Association (AMMA)

Australian Mining Association (AMA)

Mine Managers Association of Australia (MMAA)

Minerals Council of Australia (MCA)

Mines Rescue

NSW Mining and Petroleum Competence Board

 

State Training Advisory Bodies

Construction Industry Training Board (SA)

Energy Skills Queensland (ESQ)

Industry Skills Advisory Council Northern Territory (ISAC NT)

Resources and Infrastructure NSW Industry Training Advisory Body

Resources Industry Training Council (RITCWA)

 

Employee Associations

Australian Workers' Union (AWU)

Construction Forestry Mining & Energy Union (CFMEU)

 

Industry Growth Centres

Mining, Equipment, Technology and Services Growth Centre (METS Ignited)

National Energy Resources Australia (NERA)

Data sources and notes

Department of Employment 2020, Employment projections, available from the Labour Market Information Portal

  • by ANZSIC 2 digit industries employment projections to May 2024
    • 06 Coal Mining
    • 07 Oil and Gas Extraction
    • 08 Metal Ore Mining
    • 09 Non-Metallic Mineral Mining and Quarrying
    • 10 Exploration and Other Mining Support Services
    • B0 Mining nfd
    • 31 Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction.

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2020, Employed persons by Industry group of main job (ANZSIC), Sex, State and Territory, November 1984 onwards, 6291.0.55.003 EQ06, viewed 1 August 2020 https://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/6291.0.55.003May%202020?OpenDocument.

  • Employed total, by ANZSIC 2 digit industries, 2000 to 2020, May Quarter
    • 06 Coal Mining
    • 07 Oil and Gas Extraction
    • 08 Metal Ore Mining
    • 09 Non-Metallic Mineral Mining and Quarrying
    • 10 Exploration and Other Mining Support Services
    • B0 Mining nfd
    • 31 Heavy and Civil Engineering Construction.

Training data has been extracted from the National VET Provider Collection, Total VET students and courses from the following training package:

  • RII Resources and Infrastructure Industry Training Package.

This includes superseded qualifications and training packages.

Data covers a range of selected student and training characteristics in the following categories and years:

  • 2015 to 2019 program enrolments
  • 2015 to 2019 subject enrolments
  • 2015 to 2019 program completions.

Total VET students and courses data is reported for the calendar year. Program enrolments are the qualifications, courses and skill-sets in which students are enrolled in a given period. For students enrolled in multiple programs, all programs are counted. Program completion indicates that a student has completed a structured and integrated program of education or training. Location data uses student residence. Subject enrolment is registration of a student at a training delivery location for the purpose of undertaking a module, unit of competency or subject. For more information on the terms and definitions, please refer to the Total VET students and courses: terms and definitions document.

Updated: 30 Nov 2020
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