cancel
search
Search by IRC, Industry, sector, training package, IRC skills forecast or occupation.

Overview

This page provides information on the Recreational Vehicles sector which is a component of the Manufacturing industry.

The Recreational Vehicle sector manufactures, repairs, services and retails recreational vehicles and accessories, including motor homes, caravans, camper trailers, slide-on campers and fifth wheelers. It is divided into three sub-sectors:

  • Recreational Vehicles Manufacture
  • Recreational Vehicles Service and Repair
  • Recreational Vehicles Accessories Sales.

Recreational vehicle manufacturing in Australia continues to show strong growth. Over 22,000 units were constructed in 2017, a 2.5% increase on 2016. The number of units manufactured annually, has consistently exceeded 20,000 since 2010.

Vocational education and training (VET) is required for Recreational Vehicle-related occupations such as:

  • Vehicle Body Builders and Trimmers
  • Motor Vehicle Parts and Accessories Fitters.

Nationally recognised training for the Recreational Vehicles sector is delivered under the MSM – Manufacturing Training Package.

For information on the Process Manufacturing, and Laboratory Operations sectors please visit the respective pages.

All data sources are available at the end of the page.

Employment trends

There is insufficient data on employment in the Recreational Vehicles sector to provide an analysis of employment trends.

Training trends

Training snapshot

Program enrolments in Recreational Vehicles-related qualifications peaked in 2019, at approximately 250, before declining to more than 180 in 2020. Similarly, program completions peaked in 2019, at approximately 120, and declined in 2020 to more than 60. All program enrolments were at the Certificate III level. The intended occupations from training in Recreational Vehicles-related qualifications training were Motor Mechanic (General) and Vehicle Body Builder.

TAFE institutes delivered all the training in 2020. Approximately 84% of subjects were Commonwealth and state government funded, with the remainder (16%) funded via domestic fee for service arrangements.

Victoria had the highest proportion of students enrolled in Recreational Vehicle-related qualifications (38%), followed by New South Wales (35%) and Queensland (27%). Approximately two-fifths (40%) of program enrolments were delivered in Victoria, followed by a third (33%) in New South Wales and more than a quarter (27%) in Queensland.

In 2020, the number of commencing apprentices and trainees rose to approximately 100 from about 70 in 2019. The number of completions declined in 2020 to approximately 30 from about 70 in 2019. The intended occupations from Recreational Vehicle-related apprenticeships and traineeships in 2020 were Motor Mechanic (General) and Vehicle Body Builder. Victoria had the highest proportion of apprentices and trainees (42%) in this sector in 2020, followed by New South Wales (32%) and Queensland (26%).

For more data specific to your occupation, industry group or training package, visit NCVER’s Data Builder.

For more data specific to your region visit NCVER’s Atlas of Total VET.

If you are interested in extracting NCVER data to construct tables with data relevant to you, sign up for a VOCSTATS account.

Industry insights

Industry insights on skills needs

The Process Manufacturing, Recreational Vehicle and Laboratory IRC’s Skills Forecast and Proposed Schedule of Work 2019-2023 identified regulatory/legislative standards, changing consumer behaviour and technological advances, were driving changes for priority skills.

As well as demand for skills in using/adapting to environmentally/sustainable practices, business related and managerial skills were a priority, as well as digital skills.

Further, demand was increasing specific industry/occupation skills, such as:

  • technical skills, such as electrical, plumbing, fibreglass and adoption of new manufacturing processes and materials
  • advanced manufacturing skills, such as robotics, 3D printing, virtual reality and holographics
  • vehicle accessories fitting technical skills, including light automotive mechanical, panel beating/auto dismantling, spray painting and auto electrical, and the fitting of new products/technologies
  • generic skills, such as community and collaboration, learning and adapting to change
  • basic knowledge of 12v solar, plumbing and repair techniques to ensure the correct information was being provided to customers of sales and repair services.

While the Process Manufacturing, Recreational Vehicle and Laboratory IRC ranked key categories of generic skills, such as Technology and Design mindset/thinking critically/systems thinking/solving problem skills, it noted that other skills are important and may vary considerably between industry sectors, regions and individual businesses. For example, customer service skills are important for the Recreational Vehicles sector, as it includes retail businesses.

At the time of its publication, the 2019 Skills Forecast and Proposed Schedule of Work 2019-2023 reported the recreational vehicle sector was growing due to the availability of a wide variety of products from low-priced imports through to high-end locally-manufactured products. Further, the repair, maintenance, alteration and upgrading of recreational vehicles was placing high demand on experienced trade qualified technicians. Compounding this challenge was increased demand on existing technicians from time poor consumers, who at times engaged unqualified people to carry out repairs.

At the same time, attracting new/young apprentices and trainees to the recreational vehicle sector was a challenge and the retention of quality staff was becoming more difficult.

As of December 2021, the IRC is reviewing and plans to redevelop qualifications, units of competency and develop new units of competency, under the Recreational Vehicle project, focused on manufacturing, service and repair, and accessories retailing. According to the IRC, the rational for updating the training products is due to significant changes in processes and practices across the recreational vehicle sector. The review will investigate an improved structure to better support individuals to move more easily between related RV industry occupations.

Separately, in late 2020, the Australian Government released its Modern Manufacturing Strategy as part of its economic recovery response to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Strategy aims to help manufacturers to scale-up, become more competitive and build more resilient supply chains. Investment is targeted to drive productivity and create jobs through six national manufacturing priority sectors, which reflect Australia’s competitive advantage.

In response to the Strategy, increasing changes in workforce skills requirements and ongoing disruption caused by COVID-19, the IBSA Group conducted an extensive series of research and consultation activities culminating in Scaling up: developing modern manufacturing through a skilled workforce. This report draws together insights from industry leaders on the challenges facing the manufacturing sector and proposes skills-focused responses to support the development of a highly skilled workforce to underpin the future of manufacturing in Australia. In relation to Recreational Vehicles, the IBSA Group report states how current broader industry qualifications support and relate to the modern manufacturing strategy priority sectors.

Links and resources

Data sources and notes

Training data has been extracted from the National VET Provider Collection, Total VET Students and Courses from the following training package or qualifications:

  • MSM Manufacturing Training Package
    • MSA20610 - Certificate II in Recreational Vehicle Manufacture
    • MSA30510 - Certificate III in Recreational Vehicle Service and Repair
    • MSA30610 - Certificate III in Recreational Vehicle Manufacture
    • MSM21015 - Certificate II in Recreational Vehicle Service and Repair
    • MSM21115 - Certificate II in Recreational Vehicle Manufacturing
    • MSM31015 - Certificate III in Recreational Vehicle Service and Repair
    • MSM31115 - Certificate III in Recreational Vehicle Manufacturing
    • MSM31215 - Certificate III in Recreational Vehicle and Accessories Retailing
    • MSM41015 - Certificate IV in Recreational Vehicles
    • MSM41115 - Certificate IV in Recreational Vehicle and Accessories Retailing
    • MSM51015 - Diploma of Recreational Vehicles
    • THC20104 - Certificate II in Recreational Vehicle Manufacturing
    • THC20199 - Certificate II in Recreational Vehicle Manufacturing
    • THC20204 - Certificate II in Recreational Vehicle Servicing
    • THC20299 - Certificate II in Recreational Vehicle Servicing
    • THC20304 - Certificate II in Recreational Vehicle and Accessories Retailing
    • THC20399 - Certificate II in Recreational Vehicle and Accessories Retailing
    • THC30104 - Certificate III in Recreational Vehicle Manufacturing
    • THC30199 - Certificate III in Recreational Vehicle Manufacturing
    • THC30204 - Certificate III in Recreational Vehicle Servicing
    • THC30299 - Certificate III in Recreational Vehicle Servicing
    • THC30304 - Certificate III in Recreational Vehicle and Accessories Retailing
    • THC30399 - Certificate III in Recreational Vehicle and Accessories Retailing
    • THC40104 - Certificate IV in Recreational Vehicle Manufacturing
    • THC40199 - Certificate IV in Recreational Vehicle Manufacturing
    • THC40204 - Certificate IV in Recreational Vehicle Servicing
    • THC40299 - Certificate IV in Recreational Vehicle Servicing
    • THC40304 - Certificate IV in Recreational Vehicle and Accessories Retailing
    • THC40399 - Certificate IV in Recreational Vehicle and Accessories Retailing
    • THC50104 - Diploma of Recreational Vehicle Manufacturing.

This includes superseded qualifications and training packages.

Data covers a range of selected student and training characteristics in the following categories and years:

  • 2016 to 2020 program enrolments
  • 2016 to 2020 subject enrolments
  • 2016 to 2020 program completions.

 

Total VET students and courses data is reported for the calendar year. Program enrolments are the qualifications, courses and skill sets in which students are enrolled in a given period. For students enrolled in multiple programs, all programs are counted. Program completion indicates that a student has completed a structured and integrated program of education or training. Location data uses student residence. Subject enrolment is registration of a student at a training delivery location for the purpose of undertaking a module, unit of competency or subject. For more information on the terms and definitions, please refer to the Total VET students and courses: terms and definitions document.

Low counts (less than 5) are not reported to protect client confidentiality.

Percentages are rounded to one decimal place. This can lead to situations where the total sum of proportions in a chart may not add up to exactly 100%.

MSM – Manufacturing Training Package apprentice and trainee data has been extracted from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection, including:

  • 2020 commencements
  • 2011 to 2020 completions 
  • apprentices and trainees in-training October to December 2020 collection, by qualification and state and territory of data submitter.
Updated: 21 Jan 2022
To Top