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Direct Client Care and Support

Overview

This page provides information and data on the Direct Client Care and Support sector and its related occupations.

The Direct Client Care and Support sector includes a range of multi-skilled and multi-levelled job roles in diverse health care and social assistance sub-sectors. People working in these job roles are involved in undertaking administrative, assistant, operating (i.e. technician), direct personal care and/or supervisory activities in the following sub-sectors:

  • Disability
  • Mental health
  • Alcohol and other drugs
  • Aged care and home care
  • Allied health assistance
  • Leisure and health
  • Health services assistance
  • Health support services.

Nationally recognised qualifications for occupations related to Direct Client Care and Support are delivered under the CHC – Community Services Training Package and the HLT – Health Training Package.

For more information on other community services related industries, please visit the pages for Children’s Education and Care, Client Services and Community Sector and Development.

All data sources are available at the end of the page.

Employment trends

Employment snapshot

The Health Care and Social Assistance industry is the largest employing industry in Australia. In 2021, over 1.8 million were people employed in this industry, which is projected to increase to more than 2.0 million by 2025. While it is difficult to quantify how many people work in Direct Client Care and Support, it does form a significant part of the Health Care and Social Assistance industry.

Within Direct Client Care and Support, the employment levels of Aged and Disabled Carers are projected to decline from 235,600 in 2021 to 222,300 in 2025. All other occupations within this sector, however, are projected to grow by 2025, with levels of Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers Welfare Support Workers to rise to 96,700 and Welfare Support Workers to increase to 80,500.

Training trends

Training snapshot

There were approximately 170,290 program enrolments in Direct Client Care and Support-related qualifications in 2020 and about 48,830 program completions. Both enrolments and completions declined in 2017. While program enrolments have increased between 2018 and 2020, the number of completions has fluctuated.

About 61% of enrolments were at the certificate III level, with a further 33% at the certificate IV level. About half of all enrolments in 2020 were in Individual Support (approximately 85,640). Other large qualification clusters included Disability (about 17,900 enrolments) and Aged Care and Ageing Support (approximately 14,800).

The intended occupation for qualifications in Individual Support was Personal Care Assistant. Intended occupations for other qualification clusters included Aged or Disabled Carer, Disabilities Services Officer, and Hospital Orderly.

Nearly two-thirds (65%) of training qualifications were delivered by private training providers in 2020, with TAFE institutes delivering nearly a quarter (23%) and community education providers delivering less than a tenth (8%). Most subjects were funded by government (64%) and by domestic fee for service (32%).

Almost three-quarters of all program enrolments in Direct Client Care and Support-related qualifications were undertaken by students located in Victoria (26%), New South Wales (25%) and Queensland (22%). Similarly, the majority of training was delivered in Victoria (31%), New South Wales (29%) and Queensland (23%).

Apprenticeship and traineeship commencements have dropped significantly from 2012 when criteria for Commonwealth employer incentives were tightened around skills in demand and areas of skills shortage. There were approximately 3,450 commencements in 2020. Completions have also fallen from the peak of 7,500 in 2013 to more than 1,370 in 2020.

Apprenticeships and traineeships in the Direct Client Care and Support sector are aimed at a variety of intended occupations, the largest of which is Personal Care Assistant. Other intended occupations include Disabilities Services Officer, Hospital Orderly, and Aged or Disabled Carer. New South Wales reported the highest proportion of apprentices in training (38%) in 2020, followed by Victoria (17%), and Western Australia (12%).

For more data specific to your occupation, industry group or training package, visit NCVER’s Data Builder.

For more data specific to your region please visit NCVER’s Atlas of Total VET.

If you are interested in extracting NCVER data to construct tables with data relevant to you, please sign up for a VOCSTATS account.

Industry insights

Industry insights on skills needs

The Direct Client Care and Support IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast identifies the top priority skills for the sector as mainly soft skills, ranging from emotional intelligence, teamwork and communication, resilience, stress tolerance and flexibility, through to problem solving and self-management, followed by technical / job specific skills.

The top five identified generic skills are:

  • Communication / Virtual collaboration / Social intelligence
  • Customer Service / Marketing
  • Learning agility / Information literacy / Intellectual autonomy and self management (adaptability)
  • Language, Literacy and Numeracy (LLN) (Foundation skills)
  • Design mindset / Thinking critically / System thinking / Solving problems.

According to the job vacancy data, the top requested skills by employers in the sector were communication skills and planning. The top employers were the New South Wales Government and the Government of Victoria.

The Direct Client Care and Support IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast highlights several key challenges and opportunities for the sector, including:

  • Skill shortages – needed to help those with chronic health conditions, and in the areas of dementia care and palliative care, as well a need for workers with technological and interpersonal skills
  • Government policy / legislation changes – relating to the National Disability Insurance Scheme (NDIS) and government expenditure in the Aged Care sector
  • An ageing workforce
  • A lack of career progression, a lack of career pathways and an increased casualisation of the workforce.

Skills shortages

The sector’s client base has changed over time, with the increased prevalence of mental health and alcohol and other drug-related conditions, as well as other chronic conditions such as asthma, diabetes, obesity, and arthritis. Further, there are shortages in skills related to dementia care, palliative care, technological and interpersonal skills (such as communication), most noticeably in the aged and disability care sectors. A focus on updating the workforce skills mix is therefore a high priority. However, there are a multitude of challenges influencing skills shortages across all direct client care and support workforces, such as:

  • A scarce supply of skilled trainers
  • A lack of investment in workplace training, compounded by funding limitations
  • Limited opportunities for continual training (for example, continued professional development)
  • No formal requirement for aged care-related training before entering the aged care workforce, and the onboarding of unqualified staff
  • A disassociation between components of training and industry needs (for example, skills areas such as technology, communication, customer service, negotiation, risk assessment skills, etc.)
  • Poor language, literacy and numeracy (LLN) skills
  • The high cost of training to both workers and employers, especially where there are no subsidised training places to meet sector demands.

A number of these challenges are also identified in the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety Final Report: Care, Dignity and Respect, which finds the aged care system is understaffed and the workforce underpaid and undertrained. It reports that workers often lack sufficient skills and training to cater for the needs of older people receiving aged care services. Further, the sector has difficulty attracting and retaining well-skilled people due to low wages and poor employment conditions; lack of investment in staff and, in particular, staff training; limited opportunities to progress or be promoted; and no career pathways.

The Commission’s recommendations seek to build on work of the sector-led Aged Care Workforce Industry Council and to educate and train the workforce, including:

  • Reviewing the need for specialist aged care Certificate III and IV courses, with Commissioner Briggs recommending, as part of this review, several new units of competency be considered
  • Implementing as a condition of approval of aged care providers that all workers who have direct contract with people seeking or receiving services undertake regular training about dementia care and palliative care
  • Providing ongoing professional development of the aged care workforce. This includes fast-track development of accredited nationally recognised short courses, skills sets and micro-credentials (see Chapter 12, Volume 3A).

Separately, the Royal Commission also recommends all aged care providers which promote their services to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to train their staff in culturally save and trauma-informed care (see Chapter 7, Volume 3A).

Locality is also aged care workforce issue, according to Addressing Aged Care Workforce Issues in Rural and Remote Australia. On average, older people in rural and remote areas have lower incomes, experience greater levels of disability, and reside in poorer quality housing. Further, there are higher proportions of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in rural and remote areas. However, the use of aged care places is much lower outside major cities and people living outside major cities often wait considerably longer to move into residential high care even after being approved a place. As such, this report summarises discussion that explored issues relating to recruitment and retaining an adequate, skilled aged care workforce in rural and remote Australia, and suggested measures to address these issues. The Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety Final Report: Care, Dignity and Respect also considers aged care in regional, rural and remote areas (see Chapter 8, Volume 3A).

The Committee for Economic Development of Australia (CEDA) has also examined the demand for aged care workers and estimates within the next decade there will be a shortage of 110 000 direct aged-care workers and by 2050 more than 400 000 workers. It argues that meeting the challenge requires better wages and working conditions; getting more people into training, improving training outcomes and investing in ongoing development; continued migration with new paths; investment in new technology; and, knowledge sharing and promotion of the industry.

A place-based trial of the Care Roles Skill Set developed by the Human Services Skills Organisation may help with the entry of young people into the care workforce. The Skill Set was developed in consultation with industry to rapidly upskill a ‘surge’ workforce to meet ‘unprecedented strain on the aged care and disability support’ sector in the COVID-19 pandemic. The trial explores the utility of the Skills Set for young learners entering with different levels of existing skills and employment experience.

In view of the continued growth in the NDIS, the ageing population overall, demand for workers continuing to grow and labour shortages, the Australian Government has tasked the National Skills Commission to undertake the Care Workforce Labour Market Study. This in-depth examination focuses on the current and future workforce requirements of Australia’s care and support sector and factors affecting labour supply and demand.

Government policy/legislation changes

The Direct Client Care and Support IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast identifies challenges associated with the implementation of the NDIS and tensions between funding arrangements and demand for residential aged care and other aged care services. According to the Skills Forecast, both funding and the costs of provision would be dominant issues across industry and likely impact workforce areas including staff numbers and work conditions.

The Australian Government’s NDIS National Workforce Plan: 2021-2025 seeks to build a responsive and capable workforce through initiatives that address key priorities. These priorities aim to attract people to care and support sector and strengthen entry pathways, and train and support the NDIS workforce. The latter includes the development of micro-credentials and update nationally recognised training.

In addition to the workforce measures, the NDIS National Workforce Plan: 2021-2025 also prioritises regulatory measures (reduction of red tape) and the facilitation of new service models and innovation. Further, it also prioritises provision of more market information about business opportunities in the care and support sector.

The National Disability Services annual ‘check up’ of disability service providers, the State of the Disability Sector Report 2020, finds that while it has been a difficult year for the sector, service providers have risen to the challenge. However, pricing, processes, workforce shortages and other issues are preventing the sector from operating at full strength. As such, the report offers 10 recommendations which address these matters and a way forward.

The Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety Final Report: Care, Dignity and Respect has also considered regulatory changes as they relate to educating and training the aged care workforce and recommends establishing a national registration scheme that includes a mandatory minimum qualification of a Certificate III and minimum levels of English language proficiency; and requiring a mandatory minimum Certificate III qualification for personal care workers. The Australian Government has accepted or accepted in principle most of these recommendations, as per Australian Government’s Response to the Final Report of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety (see pages 50 to 54).

The new National Agreement on Closing the Gap represents a different approach to the delivery of government services, with all Australian governments working with Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, their communities, organisations and businesses. The Commonwealth Closing the Gap Implementation Plan provides a snapshot of the Commonwealth’s existing actions, strategies and frameworks that contribute to Closing the Gap. This includes the National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Plan 2021-2031 which recognises the need for structural reform to improve access, address racism and enhance cultural safety across the whole health system. The National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Health Workforce Strategic Framework and Implementation Plan and the newly released National Medical Workforce Strategy will also work together to build a health workforce that is equipped to provide culturally safe, high quality care across all locations.

Ageing workforce

Turning to the challenge of an ageing workforce, the Direct Client Care and Support IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast reports the share of people aged 65 or over will increase in coming decades, as will the labour force participation rate. The implications of an ageing workforce mean the sector is likely to experience high levels of staff leaving the workforce. This presents challenges, in adapting the workplace arrangements to encourage mature-age workers to remain, and advantages, such as retaining extensive work experience.

The study Improving the Health of Older Aged Care Workers considers pushes to extend the working lives and participation of older ‘pink collar workers’ (those in care-related roles requiring less than a bachelor’s degree qualification) in the labour force. It also considers two other policy concerns: the effects on workers when aged care is conceptualised as a marketplace in which consumers make informed decisions about the care they wish to receive; and, the crisis in the aged care workforce. The report states that maintaining and developing this workforce is critical and requires a focus on job quality and employment conditions.

Lack of career progression

According to the Direct Client Care and Support IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast, DCCS employees experience limited career progression opportunities, but career progression is a necessary consideration for the sector’s workforce and overall quality client care. It also points to the casualisation of the workforce. According to the Disability Services Market Report 2019 there is a continuing shift towards part-time employment and casualisation. This trend means opportunities to establish long-term careers and progress are limited.

Skills IQ released the Pathways and Tertiary Education in Aged Care Discussion Paper which focuses on qualification pathways where they are relevant to work pathways given the link to competencies and occupational outcomes. The aim is to have clearer career pathways and educational articulations within and outside aged care and within and between vocational education and training and higher education.

COVID-19 impact

The following consider the impact of COVID-19 on Direct Client Care and Support sector. For further information please refer to government departments and industry bodies listed below under Links and resources.

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Advice for the Health and Disability Sector, covers such topics as attending the workplace, protection in the workplace, providing health care and supporting patients, managing COVID-19 in disability care and resources and training.

This guideline Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Outbreaks in Residential Care Facilities, provides best practice information to prevent and manage COVID-19 outbreaks in residential care facilities (RCFs) to assist: administrators of facilities; staff of facilities; health and aged care workers; and public health authorities. This guideline captures the knowledge of experienced professionals. It provides guidance on good practice, based on the available evidence at the time of completion. See also COVID-19 Outbreak Management: Preparing and Responding: Guidance for Residential Aged Care Facilities in Queensland

The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Non-Government Alcohol and Other Drug Sector: Future Implications, by UNSW Social Policy Research Centre aims to inform future planning and service delivery for NGO AOD services in NSW, ACT and TAS, and thus also other Australian states and territories. Through survey, focus group, and administrative data it focused on business practice impacts; workforce impacts; service delivery impacts; and treatment demand impacts.

Links and resources

Below is a list of industry-relevant research, organisations and associations. Hyperlinks have been included where available.

IRC and skills forecasts

 

Relevant research

A Matter of Care: Australia’s Aged Care Workforce Strategy – Aged Care Workforce Strategy Taskforce

Australian Government’s Response to the Final Report of the Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety – Commonwealth of Australia (Department of Health)

Care Workforce Labour Market Study – National Skills Commission

Commonwealth Closing the Gap Implementation Plan – Commonwealth of Australia

Coronavirus (COVID-19) Advice for the Health and Disability Sector – Australian Government Department of Health

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Outbreaks in Residential Care Facilities – Communicable Diseases Network Australia

COVID-19 Outbreak Management: Preparing and Responding: Guidance for Residential Aged Care Facilities in Queensland – Queensland Health

Disability Services Market Report 2019 – Gemma Carey and Megan Weier

Duty of Care: Meeting the Aged Care Workforce Challenge – Committee for Economic Development of Australia

National Aboriginal and Torres Strait Island Health Workforce Strategic Framework - Australian Government Department of Health

National Medical Workforce Strategy – Australian Government Department of Health

NDIS National Workforce Plan: 2021-2025 – Commonwealth of Australia (Department of Social Services)

Pathways and Tertiary Education in Aged Care Discussion Paper – The Centre for Workforce Futures and SkillsIQ

Royal Commission into Aged Care Quality and Safety Final Report: Care, Dignity and Respect – Commonwealth of Australia

State of the Disability Sector Report 2020 – National Disability Services

The Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on the Non-Government Alcohol and Other Drug Sector: Future Implications – Katinka van de Ven, Allison Ritter and Robert Stirling

 

Industry associations and advisory bodies

Aged and Community Services Australia (ACSA)

Allied Health Professions Australia (AHPA)

Australian Community Workers Association (ACWA)

Carers Australia

Community Mental Health Australia (CMHA)

Diversional and Recreation Therapy Australia (DRTA)

Leading Age Services Australia (LASA)

Mental Health Australia

National Disability Services (NDS)

 

Alcohol and other drugs State and Territory peak associations

Alcohol Tobacco and Other Drug Association ACT (ATODA)

Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Council Tasmania (ATDC)

Association of Alcohol and Other Drug Agencies NT (AADANT)

Network of Alcohol and Other Drugs Agencies (NSW) (NADA)

Queensland Network of Alcohol and Other Drug Agencies (QNADA)

South Australian Network of Drug and Alcohol Services (SANDAS)

Victorian Alcohol and Drug Association (VAADA)

Western Australian Network of Alcohol and Other Drug Agencies (WANADA)

 

Employee associations

Australian Nursing and Midwifery Federation (ANMF)

Australian Services Union (ASU)

Health Services Union (HSU)

United Workers Union

 

Regulators

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Practice Board of Australia

Australian Government Aged Care Quality and Safety Commission

Data sources and notes

Department of Employment 2021, Employment Projections, available from the Labour Market Information Portal

  • by ANZSIC 1 digit industry, Health Care and Social Assistance, employment projections to May 2025
  • by ANZSCO, selected occupations, employment projections to May 2025
    • 2721 Counsellors
    • 3112 Medical Technicians
    • 4113 Diversional Therapists
    • 4117 Welfare Support Workers
    • 4231 Aged and Disabled Carers
    • 4233 Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers.

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2021, 6291.0.55.001 - EQ06 - Employed persons by Industry group of main job (ANZSIC), Sex, State and Territory, November 1984 onwards, viewed 1 August 2021,  https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/labour/employment-and-unemployment/labour-force-australia-detailed/may-2021

  • Employed total by ANZSIC 1 digit ‘Health Care and Social Assistance’, 2001 to 2021, May Quarter.

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2021, 6291.0.55.001 - EQ08 - Employed persons by Occupation unit group of main job (ANZSCO), Sex, State and Territory, August 1986 onwards, viewed 1 August 2021 https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/labour/employment-and-unemployment/labour-force-australia-detailed/may-2021  

  • Employed total by ANZSCO 4 digit ‘2721 Counsellors’, ‘3112 Medical Technicians’, ‘4113 Diversional Therapists’, ‘4117 Welfare Support Workers’, ‘4231 Aged and Disabled Carers’, and ‘4233 Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers’, 2001 to 2021, May Quarter.

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2017, 2016 Census – employment, income and unpaid work, TableBuilder. Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data.

  • Employment level by 1 digit industry, Health Care and Social Assistance, and 4 digit level occupations to identify the relevant VET-related occupations in the industry as a proportion of the total workforce.

 

Training data has been extracted from the National VET Provider Collection, Total VET students and courses from the following training packages or qualifications:

  • CHC – Community Services and HLT – Health Training Packages
  • Aged Care and Ageing Support
    • CHC30102 - Certificate III in Aged Care Work
    • CHC30208 - Certificate III in Aged Care
    • CHC30212 - Certificate III in Aged Care
    • CHC40102 - Certificate IV in Aged Care Work
    • CHC40108 - Certificate IV in Aged Care
    • CHC43015 - Certificate IV in Ageing Support
  • Alcohol and Other Drugs
    • CHC40408 - Certificate IV in Alcohol and Other Drugs Work
    • CHC40412 - Certificate IV in Alcohol and Other Drugs
    • CHC43215 - Certificate IV in Alcohol and Other Drugs
    • CHC50208 - Diploma of Community Services (Alcohol and other drugs)
    • CHC50212 - Diploma of Community Services (Alcohol and other drugs)
    • CHC50408 - Diploma of Community Services (Alcohol, other drugs and mental health)
    • CHC50412 - Diploma of Community Services (Alcohol, other drugs and mental health)
    • CHC51102 - Diploma of Alcohol and Other Drugs Work
    • CHC53215 - Diploma of Alcohol and Other Drugs
  • Allied Health Assistance
    • HLT32407 - Certificate III in Allied Health Assistance
    • HLT32412 - Certificate III in Allied Health Assistance
    • HLT33015 - Certificate III in Allied Health Assistance
    • HLT42507 - Certificate IV in Allied Health Assistance
    • HLT42512 - Certificate IV in Allied Health Assistance
    • HLT43015 - Certificate IV in Allied Health Assistance
  • Disability
    • CHC30302 - Certificate III in Disability Work
    • CHC30408 - Certificate III in Disability
    • CHC40308 - Certificate IV in Disability
    • CHC40312 - Certificate IV in Disability
    • CHC43115 - Certificate IV in Disability
    • CHC50102 - Diploma of Disability Work
    • CHC50108 - Diploma of Disability
    • CHC60108 - Advanced Diploma of Disability Work
    • CHC60112 - Advanced Diploma of Disability
  • Health Services Assistance
    • HLT32507 - Certificate III in Health Services Assistance
    • HLT32512 - Certificate III in Health Services Assistance
    • HLT33115 - Certificate III in Health Services Assistance
  • Health Supervision
    • HLT40407 - Certificate IV in Health Supervision
    • HLT40412 - Certificate IV in Health Supervision
  • Health Support Services
    • HLT21207 - Certificate II in Health Support Services
    • HLT21212 - Certificate II in Health Support Services
    • HLT23215 - Certificate II in Health Support Services
    • HLT32807 - Certificate III in Health Support Services
    • HLT32812 - Certificate III in Health Support Services
    • HLT33215 - Certificate III in Health Support Services
  • Home and Community Care
    • CHC30202 - Certificate III in Home and Community Care
    • CHC30308 - Certificate III in Home and Community Care
    • CHC30312 - Certificate III in Home and Community Care
    • CHC40208 - Certificate IV in Home and Community Care
    • CHC40212 - Certificate IV in Home and Community Care
  • Individual Support
    • CHC33015 - Certificate III in Individual Support.
  • Leisure and Health
    • CHC40608 - Certificate IV in Leisure and Health
    • CHC43415 - Certificate IV in Leisure and Health
    • CHC50508 - Diploma of Leisure and Health
    • CHC50512 - Diploma of Leisure and Health
    • CHC50802 - Diploma of Community Services (Lifestyle and Leisure)
    • CHC53415 - Diploma of Leisure and Health
  • Mental Health
    • CHC40508 - Certificate IV in Mental Health
    • CHC40512 - Certificate IV in Mental Health
    • CHC41102 – Certificate IV in Mental Health Work (Non-clinical)
    • CHC42912 - Certificate IV in Mental Health Peer Work
    • CHC43315 - Certificate IV in Mental Health
    • CHC43515 - Certificate IV in Mental Health Peer Work
    • CHC50308 - Diploma of Community Services (Mental health)
    • CHC50312 - Diploma of Community Services (Mental health)
    • CHC53315 - Diploma of Mental Health
  • Nutrition and Dietetic Assistance
    • HLT31507 - Certificate III in Nutrition and Dietetic Assistance
    • HLT31512 - Certificate III in Nutrition and Dietetic Assistance.

This includes superseded qualifications and training packages.

Data covers a range of selected student and training characteristics in the following categories and years:

  • 2016 to 2020 program enrolments
  • 2016 to 2020 subject enrolments
  • 2016 to 2020 program completions.

 

Total VET students and courses data is reported for the calendar year. Program enrolments are the qualifications, courses and skill-sets in which students are enrolled in a given period. For students enrolled in multiple programs, all programs are counted. Program completion indicates that a student has completed a structured and integrated program of education or training. Location data uses student residence. Subject enrolment is registration of a student at a training delivery location for the purpose of undertaking a module, unit of competency or subject. For more information on the terms and definitions, please refer to the Total VET students and courses: terms and definitions document.

Low counts (less than 5) are not reported to protect client confidentiality.

Percentages are rounded to one decimal place. This can lead to situations where the total sum of proportions in a chart may not add up to exactly 100%.

Community Services training package apprentice and trainee data has been extracted from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection, including:

  • 2011 to 2020 commencements
  • 2011 to 2020 completions 
  • apprentices and trainees in-training October to December 2020 collection, by qualification and state and territory of data submitter.

 

Job vacancy data have been extracted from Burning Glass Technologies 2021, Labor Insight Real-time Labor Market Information Tool, Burning Glass Technologies, Boston, viewed July 2021, https://www.burning-glass.com.

Data shown represent most requested generic skills, occupations and employers according to internet job postings in Australia between July 2018 and June 2021 filtered by ANZSIC and ANZSCO classification levels listed below.

  • Generic skills / Occupations
    • 27 Legal, Social and Welfare Professionals
    • 41 Health and Welfare Support Workers
    • 42 Carers and Aides
    • 134 Education, Health and Welfare Services Managers
    • Industry Sector: Health Care and Social Assistance.
  • Employers
    • 1342 Health and Welfare Services Managers
    • 4211 Child Carers
    • 4233 Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers
    • 4114 Enrolled and Mothercraft Nurses
    • 2726 Welfare, Recreation and Community Arts Workers
    • Industry Sector: Health Care and Social Assistance.
Updated: 08 Nov 2021
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