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VET Teacher Training

Overview

This page provides information and data on VET Teacher Training, which is one component of the Education industry.

Vocational education and training (VET) is the largest education sector in Australia, with 4.2 million enrolments in 2017 (compared to 2.2 million enrolments in primary education, the next largest sector). VET teachers play a pivotal role in training a flexible workforce, addressing skills gaps and supporting Australia’s future economic prosperity. It is therefore essential that VET teachers receive appropriate and sufficient initial training through the Training and Education Training Package and have access to ongoing professional development opportunities.

In February 2019, 246,170 people were employed in the VET workforce – there were 45,630 employees at TAFE institutes and 200,540 employees at other Registered Training Organisations (RTOs). In the overall VET workforce, 71,380 people were employed as trainers and assessors (29% of the VET workforce), including those delivering training under the supervision of a trainer, and 93% had a Certificate IV in Training and Assessment or higher-level qualification.

Nationally recognised training to deliver vocational education and training is delivered under the TAE – Training and Education Training Package.

All data sources are available at the end of the page.

Employment trends

Employment snapshot

The Education industry, including Tertiary Education and Adult, Community and Other Education, saw considerable growth between 2001 and 2021. The employment level of the Tertiary Education industry, which includes VET and Higher Education, grew from 171,900 in 2001 to 246,000 in 2021. It is projected to increase to 265,900 by 2025. The employment level of the Adult, Community and Other Education industry grew from 52,000 in 2001 to 237,400 in 2021. It is projected to decline to 201,700 by 2025.

The employment level of Vocational Education Teachers has fluctuated since 2001. Employment in the occupation peaked in 2009 at 47,100 but declined to 40,400 in 2021. It is projected to decline further to 37,500 by 2025.

Training trends

Training snapshot

Program enrolments in VET Teacher Training-related qualifications declined year on year between 2016 and 2018 but rose sharply in 2019 to a peak of approximately 66,970, before declining to around 41,500 in 2020. Program completions more than halved between 2016 and 2018 but rose sharply in 2019 to a peak of approximately 35,420, before declining to around 17,660 in 2020.

Between 2016 and 2020 the majority of VET Teacher Training-related subjects were delivered as part of a nationally recognised program. In 2020, around 12% of VET Teacher Training-related subjects were not delivered as part of a nationally recognised program.

In 2020, the majority of program enrolments were at the certificate IV level (94%) with the remainder at the diploma or higher level. Approximately 94% of program enrolments were in Training and Assessment qualifications with an intended occupation of Vocational Education Teacher.

Most of the training was delivered by private training providers (72%) and TAFE institutes (22%). The majority of subjects were funded through domestic fee for service (76%) and Commonwealth and state funding (22%).

New South Wales had the single highest proportion of students enrolled in VET Teacher Training-related qualifications in 2020, with 31%, followed by Victoria with 24% and Queensland with 20%.

The majority of training was delivered in Queensland (37%), New South Wales (26%) and Victoria (19%).

Apprentice and trainee commencements peaked at 690 in 2012, before declining to a low of 9 in 2015. Between 2015 and 2020 commencements have been rising to a new high of around 190 in 2020. Apprentice and trainee completions have followed a similar trend to commencements. Completions rose between 2011 and 2013, peaking at around 340, before declining to a low of 0 in 2016. Between 2016 and 2020 completions have been rising again, up to 50 in 2020.

For more data specific to your occupation, industry group or training package, visit NCVER’s Data Builder.

For more data specific to your region visit NCVER’s Atlas of Total VET.

If you are interested in extracting NCVER data to construct tables with data relevant to you, sign up for a VOCSTATS account.

Industry insights

Industry insights on skills needs

The Education IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast suggests the top three priority skills for the Education industry are:

  • Understanding, implementation of, and compliance with, regulatory changes
  • Demonstrating an ability to adapt to changes and continuously deliver high quality training
  • Undertaking and applying research to training practice.

The Skills Forecast states that the top five generic skills required in the Education industry are:

  • Learning agility / Information literacy / Intellectual autonomy and self-management (adaptability)
  • Language, Literacy and Numeracy (LLN) (Foundation skills)
  • Design mindset / Thinking critically / System thinking / Solving problems
  • Communication / Virtual collaboration / Social intelligence
  • Managerial / Leadership.

The Skills Forecast also identifies the top four priority industry and occupation skills as:

  • Skills to identify individual learner needs
  • Working and catering for learners with disability
  • Planning, organising and delivering learning in both group based and workplace learning environments
  • Facilitating of online and face to face learning.

According to the job vacancy data, the top requested skills by employers were communication skills, followed by planning, building effective relationships, research and English. The most advertised occupations were Performing Arts Teacher, Co-Educator and Literacy Teacher. The top employers were the Government of Victoria, Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology University and the Government of Queensland. The top locations for job advertisements were Victoria and New South Wales.

The Education IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast acknowledges that the level of skill required for workers in the vocational education sector is high due to the requirement for contemporary industry expertise, as well as specialist training and assessing skills. In addition to specialised skills in subject areas, key current competency needs for VET sector workers include:

  • Identifying individual learner needs, including learning style and language, literacy and numeracy skill needs
  • Designing and developing learning strategies, resources and programs
  • Planning, organising and delivering learning in both group based and workplace learning environments
  • Facilitating online and face to face learning, including active listening, monitoring and presentation skills
  • Designing and developing assessment tools
  • Planning and executing activities and processes to assess competence and participating in validation of assessment.

The ability to apply these skills requires VET trainers and assessors to have a developed understanding of the psychology of learning, of different learning styles and the pedagogy of the sector.

The Education IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast highlights several key drivers in the vocational education sector:

  • Structural economic changes – Structural change often means that while some industries grow, jobs in some industries will disappear in response to industry decline. Workers in these industries will be required to gain employment in other sectors and may require reskilling to do this. Growth in services exports (education and tourism), health and social services (including aged care), and some professional services (notably finance and technology services) will mean that many new students will need to be trained to fill positions in these industries. It will be important to ensure that all learners and workers are prepared for careers, rather than for a single job role, and that they have the right skills to take advantage of emerging opportunities. The VET sector has a critical role to play in enabling this training and ensuring that learners and workers are prepared for future industries and occupations. Additionally, it will be critical that the VET trainer and assessor workforce continues to upskill and seek professional development in order to retain currency. These structural changes also mean that where there is an increased demand for new workers or upskilling in an industry, there is potential for an increased demand for VET trainers and assessors in those growth industries. Conversely, there may be a reduced demand for VET trainers and assessors in slowing industries. Overall, the increasing sophistication of the economy will require VET trainers and assessors to be better skilled and prepared for these changes in the workforce.
  • Technological advances – In the VET sector, the impact of new and emerging technology is dual faceted. Technological developments are impacting how vocational education material is delivered, thereby impacting the necessary skill requirements of trainers and assessors, whilst simultaneously impacting the content of vocational training.
  • Regulatory reform – The regulatory and policy environment pertaining to the VET sector is complicated, with numerous layers of State and Federal regulation and standards. This creates a complex operating environment for organisations as well as individual trainers and assessors who must stay abreast of varying requirements.
  • Learner cohort changes – Key trends are changing the composition and characteristics of the VET learner cohort and it can be challenging for VET teachers to address the needs of a very diverse learner population. Reskilling and upskilling across industries as job requirements change will likely result in a learner cohort that encompasses a variety of ages, backgrounds and experiences. VET has a high level of engagement with diverse learner groups including Indigenous learners and learners with a disability.

The Education IRC is undertaking a project to review the TAE Training Package to ensure it aligns with the current skills needs of the VET sector and provides greater pathways into the profession. The TAE Training Package was last reviewed in 2015 and uploaded in 2016. In the years since, the VET teaching, training and assessment landscape has drastically changed. The Education IRC considers that the TAE Training Package is currently not fit for purpose and does not fully address the needs of the VET sector for the following reasons:

  • TAE units of competency do not deliver the variety, nor depth, of skills and knowledge that are relevant in a modern VET teaching, training and assessment environment.
  • The packaging rules of TAE40116 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment do not provide adequate flexibility for learners pursuing the variety of VET teaching, training and assessment job roles that exist in the modern labour market.
  • The TAE Training Package does not make use of 'stackable' skill sets that allow for a 'scaffolded' approach to skill development and attainment of qualifications.
  • The TAE Training Package is not structured to support the range, and diversity of career pathways available to workers in the VET industry, meaning that existing qualifications (beyond TAE40116 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment) are often underutilised.
  • The structure and content of the TAE Training Package does not address the skills gaps of those working in other education sub-sectors such as VET for Secondary Students or enterprise training.

The holistic review of the TAE Training Package will review six qualifications and 55 units of competency in the TAE Training Package. This project will run until the end of 2022.

The Education IRC is also undertaking an E-assessment project. This project was created as an urgent response to address an identified gap in e-assessment in the TAE Training Package involving the development of two new units of competency. This project will be completed in early 2022.

The opinions of currently employed VET trainers and assessors were investigated to identify what should be included in a program of learning that will prepare them and others to be effective in their roles of supporting Australian industry and enterprise. The report VET Practitioners: A Front-Line Investigation, identifies the competencies that VET trainers and assessors require in order to perform their roles effectively.

Conceptualisations about teachers and teaching have important implications for teachers' practice, expectations of their practice, their initial education and continuing professional development. The journal article Teacher as Person: The Need for an Alternative Conceptualisation of the 'Good' Teacher in Australia's Vocational Education and Training Sector, presents empirical data from a qualitative multiple case study to discuss conceptualisations of good teaching in Australia's VET sector. It argues that the sector's contemporary discourse, influenced by neoliberalist reforms and accompanied by the development of a culture of performativity, reflects a predominantly 'reductionist' approach to conceptualising teaching – one which seeks to atomise teaching to produce a prescriptive list of capabilities VET teachers need in order to teach well. There exists, however, an alternative, more holistic approach which focuses on the personal, recognising the importance of the individual teacher. Developing ways to describe VET teaching using a holistic approach may help to provide an even more insightful and comprehensive understanding of 'good' VET teaching, which may in turn inform strategies for the education and development of VET teachers in the future.

The rise of Industry 4.0 and the digital economy has highlighted the need for the general workforce to hold digital skills. Teaching Digital Skills: Implications for VET Educators – Good Practice Guide highlights the implications for VET educators of the increasing need to include digital skills in VET delivery. Key findings include:

  • It is critical that VET educators have the capacity to: use technology effectively in their teaching practice; use technology that is relevant to their industry; and help learners to develop their own digital skills.
  • Professional development activities for building the digital capability of VET educators can take many forms, including self-assessment tools, competency frameworks and short courses.
  • Key to the successful uptake of digital skills capability development by VET educators is a whole-of-organisation approach to the adoption and utilisation of digital skills.

VET teachers often begin teaching with limited or no teaching qualifications, and necessarily much of their learning to be a teacher takes place in the teaching workplace. The journal article What Novice Vocational Education and Training Teachers Learn in the Teaching Workplace, considers what novice VET teachers learn in the workplace and what enables and constrains that learning. The author argues that teachers learn to undertake their teaching role primarily in the same way as others in their teaching department undertake the role. The article introduces the concept of three different groups of VET teachers whose learning is enabled and constrained in different ways: fringe teachers; favela teachers; and those who have an employment contract or are permanently employed. Using the theory of practice architectures, the author shows that teacher learning in the workplace is impacted by various site based conditions: including material arrangements; arrangements related to the use of VET language and of industry related language; and social-political arrangements.

The report The VET Teaching Workforce in Australia, begins with some background information about the Australian VET system, its students and its teaching workforce. Three main aspects of the VET teaching workforce are then covered: (1) working conditions of VET teachers, including wages and working hours, compared with other occupations; (2) qualifications and professional development for VET teachers; and (3) career development, career guidance, and career management for VET teachers.

Quality student outcomes are reliant on quality teaching. Equally important is student access to pathways at school that enable them to succeed post-school. This includes high quality VET options and as such there is a need for a high quality and sustainable workforce of VET teachers/trainers and assessors in schools that can meet the diverse needs of secondary students, and maintain the quality and industry relevance of the VET being delivered. The Building a High Quality and Sustainable Dual Qualified VET Workforce: Final Report proposes a series of recommendations, supported by underpinning principles that aim to improve the availability, sustainability and quality of the VET in schools workforce.

Educational research has highlighted the importance of having trained professional teachers to teach, nurture and support students who wish to enter a trade or technical career. The closure of the Bachelor of Technology Education course, the only initial teacher education (ITE) course in Victoria dedicated to the task of preparing high-quality industry experienced VET and technologies teachers, has left Victorian schools without a source of qualified VET and technologies teachers. Why Victoria Needs High-Quality VET and Technologies Teacher Education argues that while the Certificate IV TAE Training and assessment qualification is currently the minimum qualification required to train and assess VET curriculum in Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) in Australia, it was never designed as a teaching qualification for students, so if high-quality teaching and learning is indeed a priority in Victoria, then the Certificate IV TAE should never even be entertained as an acceptable substitute for an ITE qualification. The Campaign for VET and Technologies Education (CVTE) aims to establish ITE programs in Victoria capable of producing a sustainable supply of high-quality and professionally qualified Victorian Institute of Teaching (VIT) registered VET and technologies (Design and Technologies and Digital Technologies) teachers to resource Victorian schools.

Building Capability and Quality in VET Teaching: Opportunities and Challenges examines the form and content of current teacher capability models and frameworks in VET and other sectors to understand what defines competence and quality in VET teaching. The research also explores issues relating to the registration and accreditation of VET trainers, trainer entry-level requirements, ways of attracting practitioners to the industry and the development of a capable VET workforce.

VET teachers often begin teaching without teaching qualifications, and much of their learning necessarily takes place in the workplace. VET teaching is recognised as complex and requiring a broad range of skills and capabilities. At the same time, support for VET teacher learning in the workplace has been limited and ad hoc, with little focus on what work-based arrangements might better support teacher learning. Drawing on a study of novice VET teachers, Developing a Trellis of Practices That Support Learning in the Workplace highlights the importance of VET teacher learning in the workplace and considers the site-based arrangements that enable and constrain novice teacher learning. The paper argues that when practices that support learning are interconnected to form a trellis, teacher learning is better supported than when practices that support learning are isolated and do not interconnect with each other.

An important aspect of VET teaching is education that is strongly linked to current industry practices. While this is a desirable pursuit, there are considerable challenges in it being implemented owing to increasingly changing work environments and the notion of 'industry currency'. Teacher Industry Placement in Australia: Voices From Vocational Education and Training Managers reports on an exploratory study of the views of VET education managers of business studies on the value of teacher placement in industry (TPI) which is one way for VET teachers to remain up to date with contemporary industrial practices. The benefits of TPI may include enhanced teaching practices and the development of deeper, long-term links with industry, however, TPI opportunities are not without their challenges. The authors conclude that TPI should be an integral part of any VET professional development for teachers, but that, in order for TPI to be successful, appropriate resourcing and the development of strong industry networks are paramount.

The Nature of Teacher Professional Development in Australian International Vocational Education calls for more support and investment in VET teacher professional development tailored to their needs to operate, teach and learn effectively in a context of increased internationalisation.

Literature has previously reported that student-centred practices are the mark of good pedagogy in online education. In contrast, the competency-based nature of vocational education in Australia has been understood to encourage teacher-centred pedagogy. The likely tensions between these two teaching contexts are not yet understood, and little is yet known about the pedagogy of fully online vocational education teachers. Understanding Fully Online Teaching In Vocational Education aims to begin understanding pedagogy in this context. A wide-ranging digital survey was implemented and the findings revealed that online VET teachers conceived good online pedagogy as student-centred, yet student-student learning opportunities were rated lower than teacher-student practices. Notably, enacted practice was consistently more teacher-centred than teachers' ideal, and factors within the teaching context were perceived by teachers as a limitation. They reported their workload to be dominated by marking and administration ahead of student-centred practices such as building rapport.

A notion of being a professional and acting with professionalism suggests particular standards associated with identity and practice. For VET educators in Australia, the notion of 'professional' that is encased within association and registration does not apply. Yet these educators operate in contexts where a discourse of professionalism influences their enactment of their vocation. Constructing a Professional Identity in VET: Teacher Perspectives reports on the findings from an exploration of professional identity in relation to vocational teachers in the VET/further education sector in Australia. Twenty-six TAFE teachers provider participated in semi-structured interviews that explored current practices associated with continuing professional development, key motivations to act as a professional, and the consideration of appropriate qualification levels for VET teaching. The aspects of the research reported and discussed in this paper relate to the teachers' perceptions of themselves as professionals and the bases on which they made those judgements. The findings reveal a clear belief in themselves as professionals, and ultimately as dual professionals. The teachers were strongly grounded in their industry vocation but regarded their second vocation, teaching, as legitimising their right to be regarded as professionals, even without teacher registration or membership of a professional association.

Based on a review of the literature, Unpacking the Quality of VET Delivery explores current definitions of quality in VET, the factors that impact on the quality of delivery and the various measures used to make judgements about it. It also explores the debate in the sector on whether professional teaching standards will assist in raising the quality of delivery in VET.

In 2020, all Australian governments agreed to progress reforms to strengthen the training system to support Australia's immediate economic recovery under the Heads of Agreement for Skills Reform. In acknowledgement of the importance of the VET workforce, this commitment included developing a VET Workforce Quality Strategy. The Australian Government Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE) is developing the Strategy which will span a period of three years, commencing from early 2022, and include short, medium and long-term measures. The Issues Paper provides an overview of the key themes for the development of the VET Workforce Quality Strategy. The Consultation Feedback document summarises findings from the initial consultation with RTOs and other VET stakeholders, which have been used to inform the development of the draft Strategy. The Consultation Draft of the VET Workforce Quality Strategy was released in September 2021. It provides detailed information about the context, key themes raised during the consultations (including capability frameworks and professional standards, industry currency, professional development and support, and supporting learner cohorts) and strategy support measures.

Based on recent conversations with employers about their recruitment plans, Hays has developed a list of The Most In-Demand Skills for 2021. Within Australia's education jobs market, the skills in greatest demand are Qualified Trainers and Assessors within vocational education with industry experience and training qualifications, especially in growth sectors such as health, technology and cleaning services.

COVID-19 impact

VET providers needed to vary their delivery arrangements in response to the initial COVID-19 pandemic lockdowns and then the physical distancing requirements in place to minimise the spread of COVID-19 when learning could return to a COVID-Safe classroom environment. The transition to more flexible modes of delivery relied heavily on providers having the necessary skills to transfer their training online.

Rising to the Challenges of Delivering in a Changed World summarises three key areas of growth identified by the Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA) during the pandemic:

  • Expansion in the delivery of training products – Infection control training was as a priority across industry during the pandemic. In response to this, four new infection control skill sets were endorsed to enable infection control training across the retail, food and beverage, and transport and logistics sectors. The AISC developed resources to deliver to these specific cohorts. ASQA automatically approved 592 RTOs to deliver the required unit so these providers can offer the skill sets.
  • Online or other distance delivery of VET – As providers looked for alternative ways to continue to offer training without a face-to-face requirement, online and other distance delivery became more common. Many providers moved to a form of distance delivery to protect the health of their students and staff and to respond to changing consumer demand. ASQA published a dedicated webpage on distance delivery to provide advice to the sector on how to continue to deliver quality outcomes when using distance learning techniques and tools. The webpage also provides access to specific industry area resources and insights from providers and other stakeholders to assist those thinking of moving into a distance learning mode.
  • Mandatory work placement and practical assessment in the workplace – ASQA received considerable feedback from providers and other stakeholders about the challenges they faced in securing work placements and conducting practical assessments. Providers found it difficult to place learners in workplaces to fulfil assessment requirements because businesses were unable to operate or could operate only with limited people on the premises. Providers made adaptations when delivering their courses to ensure learners continued to have access to training and assessment, for example by:
    • Re-sequencing training and assessment strategies to deliver theoretical training and assessment, and offering practical delivery at a later time.
    • Adjusting training and assessment strategies to continue to deliver units of competency that do not contain requirements for assessment in the workplace.
    • Adjusting training methods so that all training is provided in a simulated environment to enable a learner to develop the required competencies before placement in a workplace for assessment.
    • Making use of simulated workplace environments for assessment, where training package requirements support this mode.

The COVID-19 crisis led to reductions in work-based learning opportunities for VET students around the world. The OECD report, Teaching and Learning in VET: Providing Effective Practical Training in School-Based Settings, argues that VET programmes can be adapted to deliver practical components of VET in school-based settings when there is a persistent shortage of work-based learning opportunities. It also describes how innovative technologies such as virtual reality (VR), augmented reality (AR) and simulators can be utilised to facilitate school-based delivery of practical learning, and to improve the effectiveness of face-to-face and online teaching in VET in the longer-term.

The digital divide is not new, nor is it uniquely Australian, but COVID-19 has brought the divide to the forefront of education. A Meta-Analysis of COVID-19: Challenging Australia's Vocational Education Sector explores the implications for VET teachers and students of the abrupt shift to online learning. Challenges for students included being able to afford to access the internet and the necessary technology, internet connectivity issues and being confident to learn in isolation. For VET teachers, learning to teach online, maintain relationships with their students and peers, and conduct assessments were some of the most significant challenges.

Links and resources

Below is a list of industry-relevant research, organisations and associations. Hyperlinks have been included where available.

 

IRC and Skills Forecasts

VET Teacher Training IRC

 

Relevant research

A Meta-Analysis of COVID-19: Challenging Australia's Vocational Education Sector – Journal of Vocational Education Studies, Volume 3, Number 2, 2020 – Matthew Pearson

Building a High Quality and Sustainable Dual Qualified VET Workforce: Final Report – Australian Institute for Teaching and School Leadership (AITSL)

Building Capability and Quality in VET Teaching: Opportunities and Challenges – Josie Misko, Hugh Guthrie and Melinda Waters

Constructing a Professional Identity in VET: Teacher Perspectives – Research in Post-Compulsory Education, Volume 26, Issue 1, 2021 – Mark A. Tyler and Darryl Dymock

Consultation Draft of the VET Workforce Quality Strategy – Australian Government Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE)

Developing a Trellis of Practices That Support Learning in the Workplace – Studies in Continuing Education, Volume 42, Issue 1, 2020 – Susanne Francisco

How can VET Teacher Education and Development be Improved? – Hugh Guthrie and Anne Jones

Industry Currency and Vocational Teachers in Australia: What is the Impact of Contemporary Policy and Practice on Their Professional Development? – Research in Post-Compulsory Education, Volume 24, Issue 1, 2019 – Teressa Schmidt

Integration of Learning for Refugee and Migrant Students: VET Teachers' Practices Through Practice Theory Lens – Journal of Vocational Education and Training, Volume 71, Issue 1, 2019 – Sarojni Choy and Gun-Britt Wärvik

Maintaining Industry and Pedagogical Currency in VET: Practitioners' Voices – International Journal of Training Research, Volume 17, Issue 1, 2019 – Mark Tyler and Darryl Dymock

Rising to the Challenges of Delivering in a Changed World – Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA)

Supporting the VET Workforce: Developing a VET Workforce Quality Strategy: Issues Paper – Australian Government Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE)

Teacher as Person: The Need for an Alternative Conceptualisation of the 'Good' Teacher in Australia's Vocational Education and Training Sector – Journal of Vocational Education and Training Volume 73, Issue 1, 2021 – Teressa Schmidt

Teacher Industry Placement in Australia: Voices From Vocational Education and Training Managers – Journal of Vocational, Adult and Continuing Education and Training, Volume 3, Issue 1, 2020 – Annamarie Schuller and Roberto Bergami

Teaching and Learning in VET: Providing Effective Practical Training in School-Based Settings – Rodrigo Torres and Marieke Vandeweyer

Teaching Digital Skills: Implications for VET Educators – Good Practice Guide – Michelle Circelli

The Most In-Demand Skills for 2021 – Hays

The Nature of Teacher Professional Development in Australian International Vocational Education – Journal of Further and Higher Education, Volume 45, Issue 1, 2021 – Ly Thi Tran and Rinos Pasura

The VET Teaching Workforce in Australia – Erica Smith

Understanding the Australian Vocational Education and Training Workforce – Genevieve Knight, Ian White and Pip Granfield

Understanding Fully Online Teaching In Vocational Education – Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning, Volume 15, Article Number 16, 2020 – Deniese Cox and Sarah Prestridge

Unpacking the Quality of VET Delivery – Hugh Guthrie and Melinda Waters

VET Practitioners: A Front-Line Investigation – Sandy Welton

VET Workforce Quality Consultation Feedback – Australian Government Department of Education, Skills and Employment (DESE)

What Novice Vocational Education and Training Teachers Learn in the Teaching Workplace – International Journal of Training Research, Volume 18, Issue 1, 2020 – Susanne Francisco

Why Victoria Needs High-Quality VET and Technologies Teacher Education – K. L. O'Reilly-Briggs, David Gallagher, Peter Murphy and the Campaign for VET & Technologies Education (CVTE)

 

Government

Australian Skills Quality Authority (ASQA)

Federal, State and Territory Departments

State and Territory regulators

 

Industry associations and advisory bodies

Australian Chamber of Commerce and Industry (ACCI)

Australian Council of Deans of Education Vocational Education Group (ACDEVEG)

Australian Industry Group (Ai Group)

Business Council of Australia (BCA)

Community Colleges Australia (CCA)

Enterprise Registered Training Organisation Association (ERTOA)

TAFE Directors Australia (TDA)

 

Employee and other organisations

Australian Education Union (AEU)

VET Development Centre (VDC)

Data sources and notes

Department of Employment 2021, Employment Projections, available from the Labour Market Information Portal

  • by ANZSIC 3 digit Industry, employment projections to May 2025
    • 810 Tertiary Education
    • 820 Adult, Community and Other Education
  • by ANZSCO, selected occupations, employment projections to May 2025
    • 2422 Vocational Education Teachers.

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2021, 6291.0.55.001 - EQ06 - Employed persons by Industry group of main job (ANZSIC), Sex, State and Territory, November 1984 onwards, viewed 1 August 2021, https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/labour/employment-and-unemployment/labour-force-australia-detailed/may-2021

  • Employed total by ANZSIC 3 digit Industry, 2001 to 2021, May Quarter
    • 810 Tertiary Education
    • 820 Adult, Community and Other Education.

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2021, 6291.0.55.001 - EQ08 - Employed persons by Occupation unit group of main job (ANZSCO), Sex, State and Territory, August 1986 onwards, viewed 1 August 2021, https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/labour/employment-and-unemployment/labour-force-australia-detailed/may-2021

  • Employed total by ANZSCO 4 digit occupation, 2001 to 2021, May Quarter.
    • 2422 Vocational Education Teachers.

 

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2017, 2016 Census – employment, income and unpaid work, TableBuilder. Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data.

  • Employment level by 4 digit industry (Higher Education, Technical and Vocational Education and Training and Adult, Community and Other Education), and 4 digit level occupation (Vocational Education Teachers) to identify the relevant VET-related occupations in the industry as a proportion of the total workforce.

 

Training data has been extracted from the National VET Provider Collection, Total VET Students and Courses from the following training packages or qualifications:

  • TAA Training and Education Training Package and TAE Training and Education Training Package
  • Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy Practice and Leadership
    • TAE70110 - Vocational Graduate Certificate in Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy Practice
    • TAE70111 - Vocational Graduate Certificate in Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy Practice
    • TAE80110 - Vocational Graduate Diploma of Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy Leadership
    • TAE80113 - Graduate Diploma of Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy Practice
    • TAE80213 - Graduate Diploma of Adult Language, Literacy and Numeracy Leadership.
  • Digital Education and International Education Services
    • TAE50310 - Diploma of International Education Services
    • TAE70311 - Graduate Certificate in International Education Services
    • TAE80312 - Graduate Certificate in Digital Education
    • TAE80316 - Graduate Certificate in Digital Education.
  • Diploma of Training Design and Development
    • TAE50211 - Diploma of Training Design and Development
    • TAE50216 - Diploma of Training Design and Development.
  • Diploma of Vocational Education and Training
    • TAE50111 - Diploma of Vocational Education and Training
    • TAE50116 - Diploma of Vocational Education and Training.
  • Management (Learning)
    • TAE70210 - Graduate Certificate in Management (Learning)
    • TAE80210 - Graduate Diploma of Management (Learning).
  • Training and Assessment
    • BSZ40198 - Certificate IV in Assessment and Workplace Training
    • TAA40104 - Certificate IV in Training and Assessment
    • TAA50104 - Diploma of Training and Assessment
    • TAE40110 - Certificate IV in Training and Assessment
    • TAE40116 - Certificate IV in Training and Assessment.

This includes superseded qualifications and training packages.

Data covers a range of selected student and training characteristics in the following categories and years:

  • 2016 to 2020 program enrolments
  • 2016 to 2020 subject enrolments
  • 2016 to 2020 program completions.

 

Total VET students and courses data is reported for the calendar year. Program enrolments are the qualifications, courses and skill-sets in which students are enrolled in a given period. For students enrolled in multiple programs, all programs are counted. Program completion indicates that a student has completed a structured and integrated program of education or training. Location data uses student residence. Subject enrolment is registration of a student at a training delivery location for the purpose of undertaking a module, unit of competency or subject. For more information on the terms and definitions, please refer to the Total VET students and courses: terms and definitions document.

Low counts (less than 5) are not reported to protect client confidentiality.

Percentages are rounded to one decimal place. This can lead to situations where the total sum of proportions in a chart may not add up to exactly 100%.

Training and Education Training Package apprentice and trainee data has been extracted from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection, including:

  • 2011 to 2020 commencements
  • 2011 to 2020 completions
  • apprentices and trainees in-training October to December 2020 collection, by qualification and state and territory of data submitter.

 

Job vacancy data have been extracted from Burning Glass Technologies 2021, Labor Insight Real-time Labor Market Information Tool, Burning Glass Technologies, Boston, viewed July 2021, https://www.burning-glass.com.

Data shown represent most requested generic skills, occupations and employers according to internet job postings in Australia between July 2018 and June 2021 filtered by ANZSIC and ANZSCO classification levels listed below.

  • Generic skills / Occupations
    • 2422 Vocational Education Teachers (Aus) \ Polytechnic Teachers (NZ).
  • Employers
    • 2422 Vocational Education Teachers (Aus) \ Polytechnic Teachers (NZ).
Updated: 16 Dec 2021
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