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Community Sector and Development

Overview

This page provides information and data on the Community Sector and Development sector, which is one component of the Community Services industry.

This sector has six components:

  • Community services
  • Indigenous environmental health/population health
  • Volunteering
  • Youth services and child protection
  • Youth justice
  • Housing.

The workforce encompasses a diverse range of job roles and functions. The job roles can involve undertaking operational, service-based and/or supervisory and management activities. This sector often overlaps with other sectors such as Health Services and Disability.

Nationally recognised training for Community Sector and Development occupations is delivered under the CHC – Community Services Training Package.

For more information on Children's Education and Care and Direct Client Care and Support please visit the respective pages.

All data sources are available at the end of the page.

Employment trends

Employment snapshot

The Health Care and Social Assistance industry is the largest employing industry in Australia and has experienced continuous employment growth since 2001. In 2021, there were approximately 1.8 million people employed in this industry, which is projected to increase to more than 2.0 million by 2025. Community Sector and Development occupations and job roles form a small part of the overall Health Care and Social Assistance industry.

Within this broader industry, employment levels for the occupations of Welfare Support Workers and Health and Welfare Services Managers have been variable over the past decade. In 2021 there were 73,000 Welfare Support Workers, projected to increase to 80,500 by 2025. In 2021 there were 29,600 Health and Welfare Services Managers, projected to fall to 28,400 by 2025. There are also a small number of Indigenous Health Workers within this industry. In 2021 there were 1,800 but this is projected to fall to 1,300 by 2025.

Training trends

Training snapshot

There were approximately 87,740 program enrolments in Community Sector and Development-related qualifications in 2020 and around 20,620 program completions. Enrolments have risen between 2017 and 2020. Completions rose between 2017 and 2019, before falling in 2020.

Around 31% of enrolments were at the diploma or higher level, followed by 28% at the certificate III level and 25% at the certificate IV level. About 74% of the enrolments were in Community Services and Coordination, with a further 10% in Youth Work and Youth Justice. The main intended occupation was Welfare Support Workers, followed by Community Worker and Youth Worker.

About 49% of the training was delivered by private training providers, with 36% being delivered by TAFE institutes and a further 8% by community education providers. The majority of subjects were funded by Commonwealth and state funding (63%) and domestic fee for service (32%). Close to three-quarters of all training was for students from the three eastern states: Victoria (25%), New South Wales (25%) and Queensland (23%).

The majority of training was delivered in Victoria (32%), New South Wales (27%) and Queensland (23%).

In 2020, there were approximately 1,030 apprenticeship and traineeship commencements and around 280 completions. After a steep decline post 2012, commencements started to rise again in 2016. Completions declined between 2013 and 2015 and have remained relatively stable since. The main intended occupations for apprentices and trainees were Welfare Support Workers and Community Worker. The largest proportion of apprentices and trainees was reported by New South Wales with 23%, followed by Tasmania with 20%, Victoria with 17% and the Northern Territory with 13%.

For more data specific to your occupation, industry group or training package, visit NCVER’s Data Builder.

For more data specific to your region please visit NCVER’s Atlas of Total VET.

If you are interested in extracting NCVER data to construct tables with data relevant to you, please sign up for a VOCSTATS account.

Industry insights

Industry insights on skills needs

The Community Sector and Development IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast suggests the top priority skills for the sector are all soft skills, ranging from teamwork and communication through to flexibility and self management. The top five identified generic skills are:

  • Communication / Virtual collaboration / Social intelligence
  • Learning agility / Information literacy / Intellectual autonomy and self management (adaptability)
  • Managerial / Leadership
  • Language, Literacy and Numeracy (LLN) (Foundation skills)
  • Customer Service / Marketing.

According to the job vacancy data, the top requested skills by employers in the sector were communication skills and planning. The most advertised occupations were Health and Welfare Services Managers followed by Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers. The top employers were the New South Wales Government and the Government of Victoria. The top locations for job advertisements were New South Wales and Victoria.

The Community Sector and Development IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast highlights several challenges the sector has been experiencing which are impacting workforce skills requirements, including:

  • Government policy/legislation changes – A number of national and state/territory-based Royal Commissions into areas of relevance for the sector (i.e. child protection, family violence, aged care, etc.) have released key recommendations impacting workforce practices.
  • Skills shortages – Skills gaps identified represent a combination of technical and 'soft skill' areas (e.g. cultural and engagement skills with various population groups, skills to identify family violence incidents, etc.).
  • Low retention of staff – Reasons for staff turnover are attributed to various factors including a lack of career pathways, the difficulty or complexity of client demands, the lack of security of employment and the burn-out of staff.
  • Lack of career progression opportunities available – The workforce strongly desires more varied and innovative career progression opportunities.
  • Ageing workforce – This is a contributing factor to the numbers of staff leaving the sector, and employers are challenged in adapting workplace arrangements that will encourage a substantial number of mature-age workers to remain in work. The advantages of retaining mature-age workers include their extensive work experience, maturity levels/professionalism, strong work ethic and reliability. Strategies to establish workforce sustainability issues, including the retention of mature-age workers, are required at both a government and an institutional level and should involve changes to human resource practices, raising the profile and status of the workforce, and implementing sector-wide strategies to address workplace remuneration and conditions.
  • Caseload management – The number of cases assigned to a practitioner and the associated time pressure poses a significant issue for the workforce. Practitioners may be managing more than 25 cases at any one time, which places significant pressures on workers to effectively support clients and their families. These pressures can cause low job satisfaction and recruitment and retention issues for organisations. The development of skills in caseload management, including self-management, resilience and emotional intelligence, is critically important for community services workers.

The above Skills Forecast also reveals that employers have indicated that for occupations in this sector, they are looking for workers with skills so they can care for, empathise and communicate with a range of audiences.

Key findings in the South Australian Community Services Workforce Insights report include:

  • The community services sector is expected to grow over the next five years, driven by a combination of the NDIS, government funding, income and donations.
  • For many community cohorts, homogeneous services create barriers and further disadvantage vulnerable people.
  • There is potential for the community services sector to move to a more person-centred care model, to offer services tailored to the specific needs of consumers.
  • Working conditions, including low wages and casualisation, mean retention is a problem for the sector.
  • The community services workforce must reflect the diversity of the community and the consumers that access services.
  • The lack of adequate services in regional areas adds to the disadvantage faced by vulnerable people in these locations.
  • A reliance on fly in, fly out health and community services workers in regional and remote areas restricts the development of trusting relationships for consumers, and limits the ability of regional communities to build their own workforce.

In the article Environmental Health in Australia: Overlooked and Underrated, the authors remind us that improvements in environmental health have had the most significant impact on health status. In Australia, life expectancy has significantly increased through provision of vaccination, safe food and drinking water, appropriate sewage disposal and other environmental health measures. Yet the profession that is instrumental in delivering environmental health services at the local community level is overlooked. Rarely featuring in mainstream media, the successes of Environmental Health Officers (EHOs) are invisible to the general public. As a consequence, students entering tertiary education are unaware of the profession and its significant role in society. This has resulted in there being too few EHOs to meet the current regulatory requirements, much less deal with the emerging environmental health issues arising from changing global conditions including climate change. To futureproof Australian society and public health this workforce issue, and the associated oversight of environmental health, must be addressed now.

The health protection and environmental management system (and its workforce) manage risks to public health associated with modifiable environmental risk factors such as air, water and soil pollution, chemical exposure, environmental degradation, climate change and radiation. Strengthening the Front-Line Health Protection and Environmental Management Workforce in Tasmania: A Workforce Development Strategic Plan for Environmental Health Officers reiterates the importance of EHOs, particularly at a local community level. Despite being one of the most essential professions for protecting human health, the environmental health profession is under-recognised, overlooked and misunderstood. This document provides directions for improving areas related to: workforce management, planning and monitoring, whilst also addressing recruitment and retention.

Emergency Volunteering 2030: Views from Managers in Volunteerism identifies a range of issues impacting volunteer sustainability, including:

  • An ageing volunteer base and difficulty in attracting younger volunteers
  • Insufficient and declining numbers of volunteers overall
  • Increased competition for volunteers, either with other organisations or with people’s other time commitments such as work and family
  • Rural recruitment and retention difficulties
  • Low volunteer diversity
  • High drop-out rates
  • Volunteer fatigue.

To re-engage volunteers as part of retention strategies, different approaches to restructuring and tailoring training of ongoing volunteers include: consolidating training; developing online training modules; introducing more accredited training; and making diverse and interesting training opportunities available to volunteers.

The article Transcending the Professional-Client Divide: Supporting Young People with Complex Support Needs Through Transitions, highlights the importance of human-centric skills for youth workers to connect with young people and bring about positive outcomes. Key skills include:

  • Non-judgmental listening
  • Displaying genuine interest in connecting with young people and understanding and accepting what is important to them
  • Being able to identify pathways through disruption or crisis
  • Coordinating appropriate supports
  • Building relationships with young people that reinforce their worth and generate a sense of belonging and being cared for.

The Understanding the Experience of Social Housing Pathways report explores the ways households experience pathways into, within and out of the Australian social housing system. An increasing body of research locates the successful delivery of human services in the quality of the relationships that are formed between workers and clients. Service users stress the importance of finding the 'right' worker to achieving meaningful outcomes, while inconsistency in workers or high turnover in staff are identified as destructive. Implicit in the provision of housing assistance are ideas of support and care. Being 'care-full' is intrinsic to good practice, while poor practice is often 'care-less'. This research found that although housing and related services might be provided to tenants, these services were not necessarily provided with care. Tenants shared many examples of care-less practice that was disrespectful, alienating and hurtful. Examples of care-full practice, where they did exist, were mostly related to the establishment and preservation of good relationships between tenants and individual workers. Such relationships were vital for tenants but could be undermined by a lack of resources and burnout amongst workers.

Trajectories: The Interplay Between Mental Health and Housing Pathways. Policy Priorities for Better Access to Housing and Mental Health Support for People with Lived Experience of Mental Ill Health and Housing Insecurity states that an important policy priority is to develop and deliver training and resources to grow the capacity of housing workers to sustain the tenancies of those with lived experience of mental ill health. Housing workers in both the private rental market and in social housing have an important role to play in assisting people to maintain their tenancies. Frontline housing workers are often in a position to identify vulnerable tenants, detect when a crisis may be emerging and link tenants with the right supports to assist them to sustain their tenancy. However, due to high workloads, a lack of understanding and knowledge, and a lack of resources housing workers can struggle to identify, monitor and appropriately respond to tenancy issues among people with lived experience of mental ill health. The capacity of housing workers could be extended by developing and delivering mental health training for front line workers and managers in order to increase their capability to identify and respond to potential housing issues among people with lived experience of mental ill health. The training should be backed by online resources available to workers to enable them to respond swiftly and appropriately. This training would need to expand beyond mental health first aid training to incorporate elements on how to identify and respond to early warning signs of mental ill health, managing difficult behaviours and trauma informed care and practice.

The Tasmanian Council of Social Service (TasCOSS) has developed A Community Services Industry Built for Tasmania's Future: Community Services Industry Plan 2021–2031. One of the strategic priorities in the Plan is ‘Workforce development and training’ – ensuring the industry has the skilled and diverse workforce it needs to deliver flexible, responsive services that can withstand future disruptors and achieve positive outcomes for clients. Community services is one of the largest and fastest growing industries in Tasmania, employing more than 17,800 local workers statewide, supported by a workforce of around 35,000 volunteers. The Community Services industry requires 4,000 new jobs by 2024 to keep pace with demand. Attracting and retaining workers is an ongoing challenge, especially in a competitive labour market and in rural and regional Tasmania. At the same time, there is an increasing requirement for higher level skills and training within the workforce. Challenges also exist in the volunteer workforce where there is a forecast gap in demand and supply of volunteers of 40% by 2029.

Despite the significant economic contribution, the important work delivered by the social sector and the growing need, major challenges are confronting the social sector workforce according to the report The Social Sector in NSW: Capitalising on the Potential for Growth. Workforce shortages are emerging, with vacancies in key occupations including care and welfare workers increasing by over 2.6 times in regional NSW over the past five years. Many workers face job instability and low pay: half of the state's social sector workers are employed in fixed-term or casual positions. Significant rising demand and unmet need is driving chronic stress and mental health concerns for social sector workers and undermining service quality. The report finds:

  • The NSW social sector provides essential care and support to over one million people each year – including those impacted by poverty, homelessness, domestic violence, mental health challenges, disability or other complex issues.
  • In the five years before the COVID-19 pandemic, one in eight jobs created in NSW was in the social sector.
  • The NSW social sector employs over 230,000 people, with annual economic output worth $15.4 billion.
  • Four out of five workers in the social sector in NSW are women.
  • The social sector will demand an additional 62,000 jobs by 2030, including 27,000 in regional NSW.
  • $1 billion net investment in care industries by governments could lift economic activity in NSW by $10 billion per year through direct generation of jobs and freeing up informal carers to participate in the labour market.

The Australian Federal Government recognises the importance of attracting and retaining a workforce that delivers critical frontline social services to vulnerable Australians and is providing $132.6 million from 2020-21 to support social services impacted by the cessation of the Social and Community Services Special Account according to the summary document Supporting Social and Community Services Sector Workers: Budget 2020–21. This funding will sustain employment and wages of women, in the sector, particularly in regional and remote areas. Women represent 84% of the 500,000 Australians employed in the social services sector. The Social and Community Services Wage Supplementation was a temporary measure intended to support the implementation of Fair Work Australia's decision to grant an Equal Remuneration Order to increase wages for low paid workers in the community services sector.

COVID-19 impact

The Australian Council of Social Service (ACOSS) report Australia's Community Sector and COVID-19: Supporting Communities Through the Crisis, provides information about the state of Australia's community service sector during the COVID-19 pandemic. For many communities, poverty and disadvantage were exacerbated in early 2020, as bushfires swept through large parts of the country, followed shortly by the COVID-19 pandemic. Survey findings provide insight into the challenges the sector has faced on multiple fronts. The need to rapidly adjust service delivery models and work practices has been exacerbated by a lack of dedicated support, following years of systemic under-investment, resource insecurity and undervaluation. However, the sector has sustained its commitment through the complex and unpredictable circumstances of this extraordinary crisis.

The follow-up report Meeting Community Needs in Difficult Times: Experiences of Australia's Community Sector, considers the impacts many services faced in 2021 as support measures which had temporarily alleviated some of the pressures on households and on community service systems during 2020, including the Coronavirus Supplement, moratoriums on evictions and JobKeeper, were withdrawn. Sector leaders wanted to see short-term measures translated into the more enduring strategies and investments needed to bolster capacity and to progress shared agendas of economic, social and community development for Australia's recovery.

The article Client-Centred Telepractice in Community Services, outlines what practitioners should consider when making decisions about if and how to engage clients through digital technologies. The COVID-19 pandemic in Australia forced organisations across the child, family and community welfare sector to shift many of their services online. Service providers and practitioners reported varied engagement and outcomes working with different client groups. From this sector feedback, positive anecdotes point to a promising ongoing role for telepractice as part of the continuum of care. Many factors can affect the success of telepractice as a service delivery modality. A client-centred approach is needed that draws on research evidence where available. This will ensure that telepractice becomes an integral part of a blended model of service delivery into the future.

The State of Volunteering in Victoria 2020 report shows an increasingly professionalised workforce, with leaders of volunteers actively developing the skills and careers of Victorians through volunteering. The COVID-19 pandemic significantly disrupted volunteerism in Victoria. There was a sharp drop in volunteering rates in the early pandemic period. The volunteering participation rate was cut in half (50.2% decline) and a there was a net decline in volunteering hours of almost two thirds (64.1%). At the same time, volunteer-involving organisations in the sector described a lot of adaptation and transition to new models of service delivery and engaging volunteers. The report highlights the impacts of COVID-19 on volunteering, including engaging and retaining volunteers during the pandemic, and finds there is further potential through volunteering to contribute even more to Victorian productivity and community wellbeing.

Links and resources

Below is a list of industry-relevant research, organisations and associations. Hyperlinks have been included where available.

 

IRC and Skills Forecasts

Community Sector and Development IRC

 

Relevant research

A Community Services Industry Built for Tasmania's Future: Community Services Industry Plan 2021–2031 – Tasmanian Council of Social Service (TasCOSS)

Australia's Community Sector and COVID-19: Supporting Communities Through the Crisis – Australian Council of Social Service (ACOSS)

Client-Centred Telepractice in Community Services - Australian Institute of Family Studies (AIFS)

Community Services Workforce Insights – South Australian Training and Skills Commission (TASC)

Emergency Volunteering 2030: Views from Managers in Volunteerism – Blythe McLennan and Tarn Kruger

Environmental Health in Australia: Overlooked and Underrated – H. Whiley, E. Willis, J. Smith and K. Ross

Meeting Community Needs in Difficult Times: Experiences of Australia's Community Sector – Australian Council of Social Service (ACOSS)

Pay Equity in Community Services: The Consequences of Federal Budgetary Decisions – The Australia Institute

State of Volunteering in Victoria 2020 – Volunteering Victoria

Strengthening the Front-Line Health Protection and Environmental Management Workforce in Tasmania: A Workforce Development Strategic Plan for Environmental Health Officers - University of Tasmania

Supporting Social and Community Services Sector Workers: Budget 2020-21 – Australian Government Department of Social Services

The Social Sector in NSW: Capitalising on the Potential for Growth – Equity Economics

Trajectories: The Interplay Between Mental Health and Housing Pathways. Policy Priorities for Better Access to Housing and Mental Health Support for People with Lived Experience of Mental Ill Health and Housing Insecurity – Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute (AHURI)

Transcending the Professional-Client Divide: Supporting Young People with Complex Support Needs Through Transitions – Kathy Ellem, Louisa Smith, Susan Baidawi, Adrienne McGhee and Leanne Dowse

Understanding the Experience of Social Housing Pathways – Kathleen Flanagan, Iris Levin, Selina Tually, Meera Varadharajan, Julia Verdouw, Debbie Faulkner, Ariella Meltzer and Anthea Vreugdenhil

Welfare Workforce – Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW)

 

Industry associations and advisory bodies

Aged and Community Services Australia (ACSA)

Australian Childhood Foundation

Australian Community Workers Association (ACWA)

Australian Council of Social Service (ACOSS)

Centre for Excellence in Child and Family Welfare

Council to Homeless Persons (CHP)

Environmental Health Australia (EHA)

Homelessness Australia

Spiritual Care Australia (SCA)

Volunteering Australia

 

Employee associations

Australasian Youth Justice Administrators (AYJA)

Australian Services Union (ASU)

Community and Public Sector Union (CPSU)

Youth Workers Australia (YWA)

Data sources and notes

Department of Employment 2021, Employment Projections, available from the Labour Market Information Portal

  • by ANZSIC 1 digit industry, Health Care and Social Assistance, employment projections to May 2025
  • by ANZSCO, selected occupations, employment projections to May 2025
    • 4117 Welfare Support Workers
    • 1342 Health and Welfare Services Managers
    • 4115 Indigenous Health Workers.

 

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2021, 6291.0.55.001 - EQ06 - Employed persons by Industry group of main job (ANZSIC), Sex, State and Territory, November 1984 onwards, viewed 1 August 2021, https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/labour/employment-and-unemployment/labour-force-australia-detailed/may-2021

  • Employed total by ANZSIC 1 digit industry, Health Care and Social Assistance, 2001 to 2021, May Quarter.

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2021, 6291.0.55.001 - EQ08 - Employed persons by Occupation unit group of main job (ANZSCO), Sex, State and Territory, August 1986 onwards, viewed 1 August 2021, https://www.abs.gov.au/statistics/labour/employment-and-unemployment/labour-force-australia-detailed/may-2021

  • Employed total by ANZSCO 4-digit unit group
    • 4117 Welfare Support Workers
    • 1342 Health and Welfare Services Managers
    • 4115 Indigenous Health Workers.

 

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2017, 2016 Census – employment, income and unpaid work, TableBuilder. Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data.

  • Employment level by 1 digit industry, Health Care and Social Assistance, and 4 digit level occupations to identify the relevant VET-related occupations in the industry as a proportion of the total workforce.

 

Training data has been extracted from the National VET Provider Collection, Total VET students and courses from the following training packages or qualifications:

  • CHC Community Services, AHC Agriculture, Horticulture and Conservation and Land Management and HLT Health Training Packages.
  • Chaplaincy and Pastoral Care
    • CHC41108 - Certificate IV in Pastoral Care
    • CHC41112 - Certificate IV in Pastoral Care
    • CHC42315 - Certificate IV in Chaplaincy and Pastoral Care.
  • Child, Youth and Family Intervention
    • CHC40313 - Certificate IV in Child, Youth and Family Intervention
    • CHC41408 - Certificate IV in Child, Youth and Family Intervention (Residential and out of home care)
    • CHC41412 - Certificate IV in Child, Youth and Family Intervention (Residential and out of home care)
    • CHC41508 - Certificate IV in Child, Youth and Family Intervention (Child protection)
    • CHC41512 - Certificate IV in Child, Youth and Family Intervention (Child Protection)
    • CHC41608 - Certificate IV in Child, Youth and Family Intervention (Family support)
    • CHC41612 - Certificate IV in Child, Youth and Family Intervention (Family Support)
    • CHC50313 - Diploma of Child, Youth and Family Intervention
    • CHC51208 - Diploma of Child, Youth and Family Intervention.
  • Community Development
    • CHC40808 - Certificate IV in Community Development
    • CHC42115 - Certificate IV in Community Development
    • CHC50708 - Diploma of Community Development
    • CHC52115 - Diploma of Community Development.
  • Community Sector Management
    • CHC60308 - Advanced Diploma of Community Sector Management
    • CHC60312 - Advanced Diploma of Community Sector Management
    • CHC62015 - Advanced Diploma of Community Sector Management
    • CHC80108 - Graduate Diploma of Community Sector Management.
  • Community Services and Coordination
    • AHC51216 - Diploma of Community Coordination and Facilitation
    • CHC10108 - Certificate I in Work Preparation (Community services)
    • CHC20108 - Certificate II in Community Services
    • CHC20112 - Certificate II in Community Services
    • CHC20202 - Certificate II in Community Services Work
    • CHC20499 - Certificate II in Community Services (Community Work)
    • CHC22015 - Certificate II in Community Services
    • CHC30108 - Certificate III in Community Services Work
    • CHC30112 - Certificate III in Community Services Work
    • CHC30802 - Certificate III in Community Services Work
    • CHC32015 - Certificate III in Community Services
    • CHC40708 - Certificate IV in Community Services Work
    • CHC40902 - Certificate IV in Community Services Work
    • CHC41012 - Certificate IV in Community Services Advocacy
    • CHC41202 - Certificate IV in Community Services Advocacy
    • CHC42002 - Certificate IV in Community Services (Service Co-ordination)
    • CHC42015 - Certificate IV in Community Services
    • CHC42308 - Certificate IV in Mediation
    • CHC42312 - Certificate IV in Mediation
    • CHC42408 - Certificate IV in Relationship Education
    • CHC42412 - Certificate IV in Relationship Education
    • CHC42512 - Certificate IV in Community Services (Information, advice and referral)
    • CHC42812 - Certificate IV in Community Services (Development and or Humanitarian Assistance)
    • CHC50608 - Diploma of Community Services Work
    • CHC50612 - Diploma of Community Services Work
    • CHC50702 - Diploma of Community Welfare Work
    • CHC51602 - Diploma of Community Services Management
    • CHC51808 - Diploma of Family Intake and Support Work
    • CHC51812 - Diploma of Family Intake and Support Work
    • CHC52008 - Diploma of Community Services (Case management)
    • CHC52015 - Diploma of Community Services
    • CHC52208 - Diploma of Community Services Coordination
    • CHC52212 - Diploma of Community Services Coordination
    • CHC60302 - Advanced Diploma of Community Services Work.
  • Indigenous Environmental Health
    • HLT21005 - Certificate II in Indigenous Environmental Health
    • HLT21007 - Certificate II in Indigenous Environmental Health
    • HLT21012 - Certificate II in Indigenous Environmental Health
    • HLT26115 - Certificate II in Indigenous Environmental Health
    • HLT26120 - Certificate II in Indigenous Environmental Health
    • HLT32312 - Certificate III in Indigenous Environmental Health.
  • Population Health
    • HLT20905 - Certificate II in Population Health
    • HLT20907 - Certificate II in Population Health
    • HLT20912 - Certificate II in Population Health
    • HLT26015 - Certificate II in Population Health
    • HLT32205 - Certificate III in Population Health
    • HLT32207 - Certificate III in Population Health
    • HLT32212 - Certificate III in Population Health
    • HLT36015 - Certificate III in Population Health
    • HLT42312 - Certificate IV in Population Health
    • HLT46015 - Certificate IV in Population Health
    • HLT51007 - Diploma of Population Health
    • HLT51012 - Diploma of Population Health.
  • Social Housing
    • CHC30512 - Certificate III in Social Housing
    • CHC40908 - Certificate IV in Social Housing
    • CHC40912 - Certificate IV in Social Housing
    • CHC42215 - Certificate IV in Social Housing
    • CHC42221 - Certificate IV in Housing
    • CHC50812 - Diploma of Social Housing.
  • Volunteering and Coordination
    • CHC10208 - Certificate I in Active Volunteering
    • CHC10212 - Certificate I in Active Volunteering
    • CHC14015 - Certificate I in Active Volunteering
    • CHC20208 - Certificate II in Active Volunteering
    • CHC20212 - Certificate II in Active Volunteering
    • CHC24015 - Certificate II in Active Volunteering
    • CHC30608 - Certificate III in Active Volunteering
    • CHC30612 - Certificate III in Active Volunteering
    • CHC34015 - Certificate III in Active Volunteering
    • CHC42708 - Certificate IV in Volunteer Program Coordination
    • CHC42712 - Certificate IV in Volunteer Program Coordination
    • CHC44015 - Certificate IV in Coordination of volunteer programs.
  • Youth Work and Youth Justice
    • CHC30602 - Certificate III in Youth Work
    • CHC40413 - Certificate IV in Youth Work
    • CHC40513 - Certificate IV in Youth Justice
    • CHC40602 - Certificate IV in Youth Work
    • CHC41808 - Certificate IV in Youth Work
    • CHC41812 - Certificate IV in Youth Work
    • CHC41908 - Certificate IV in Youth Justice
    • CHC41912 - Certificate IV in Youth Justice
    • CHC50413 - Diploma of Youth Work
    • CHC50502 - Diploma of Youth Work
    • CHC50513 - Diploma of Youth Justice
    • CHC51408 - Diploma of Youth Work
    • CHC51508 - Diploma of Youth Justice
    • CHC51512 - Diploma of Youth Justice.

 

This includes superseded qualifications and training packages.

Data covers a range of selected student and training characteristics in the following categories and years:

  • 2016 to 2020 program enrolments
  • 2016 to 2020 program completions.

 

Total VET students and courses data is reported for the calendar year. Program enrolments are the qualifications, courses and skill-sets in which students are enrolled in a given period. For students enrolled in multiple programs, all programs are counted. Program completion indicates that a student has completed a structured and integrated program of education or training. Location data uses student residence. Subject enrolment is registration of a student at a training delivery location for the purpose of undertaking a module, unit of competency or subject. For more information on the terms and definitions, please refer to the Total VET students and courses: terms and definitions document.

Low counts (less than 5) are not reported to protect client confidentiality.

Percentages are rounded to one decimal place. This can lead to situations where the total sum of proportions in a chart may not add up to exactly 100%.

CHC Community Services Training Package apprentice and trainee data has been extracted from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection, including:

  • 2011 to 2020 commencements
  • 2011 to 2020 completions
  • apprentices and trainees in-training October to December 2020 collection, by qualification and state and territory of data submitter.

 

Job vacancy data have been extracted from Burning Glass Technologies 2021, Labor Insight Real-time Labor Market Information Tool, Burning Glass Technologies, Boston, viewed July 2021, https://www.burning-glass.com.

Data shown represent most requested generic skills, occupations and employers according to internet job postings in Australia between July 2018 and June 2021 filtered by ANZSIC and ANZSCO classification levels listed below.

  • Generic skills / occupations
    • 27 Legal, Social and Welfare Professionals
    • 41 Health and Welfare Support Workers
    • 42 Carers and Aides
    • 134 Education, Health and Welfare Services Managers
    • Industry Sector: Health Care and Social Assistance.
  • Employers
    • 1342 Health and Welfare Services Managers
    • 4114 Enrolled and Mothercraft Nurses
    • 4233 Nursing Support and Personal Care Workers
    • 2726 Welfare, Recreation and Community Arts Workers
    • 4117 Welfare Support Workers
    • Industry Sector: Health Care and Social Assistance.
Updated: 27 Oct 2021
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