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Aquaculture and Wild Catch

Overview

This page provides information and data on the Seafood industry. The Seafood industry can be described as having four main sectors:

  • Aquaculture (offshore, inshore and onshore)
  • Fishing (commercial)
  • Seafood processing and wholesaling
  • Fisheries compliance.

The industry includes more than 7,000 commercial businesses that collectively employ approximately 17,000 people. Nearly 70% of these businesses focus on fishing. Over 60% of commercial businesses are non-employing operations, and over 30% employ fewer than 20 people. Many industry operators are under pressure due to Australia's continued reliance upon seafood imports. Small businesses without the means to compete have been forced to exit the industry. This has increased the market share of the leading businesses, with the four largest aquaculture operators accounting for 40% of industry revenue.

Nationally recognised training for the Seafood industry is delivered under the SFI – Seafood Industry Training Package. All 14 Seafood Industry Training Package qualifications have been reviewed and redeveloped, and were released on 21 June 2019.

For information on Food Production and other Agriculture sectors please visit the respective pages.

Information sourced from the Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC’s 2019 Skills Forecast and the Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC’s 2020 Skills Forecast.

All data sources are available at the end of the page.

IRC and skills forecasts

IRCs now submit comprehensive Skills Forecasts to the AISC every 3 years, with abridged annual updates submitted in the intervening 2 years.

Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC

Employment trends

Please note: any employment projections outlined below were calculated by the Australian Bureau of Statistics prior to COVID-19.

Employment snapshot

The employment levels in the Aquaculture, Fishing and Seafood Processing industries fluctuated between 2000 and 2020. In 2020 there were around 4,600 workers employed in the Aquaculture industry, which is projected to increase to 5,200 by 2024. There were around 5,500 workers employed in the Fishing industry in 2020, which is projected to increase to 6,000 by 2024. There were around 2,300 workers in the Seafood Processing industry in 2020, which is projected to decrease to 2,100 by 2024.

In the Aquaculture industry, the occupation with the largest proportion of employment is Aquaculture Farmers (33%) followed by Aquaculture Workers (11%). A small decrease in employment is projected for Aquaculture Farmers (1%), Aquaculture Workers (2%) and Agricultural Technicians (5%) by 2024. A small increase in employment is projected for Deck and Fishing Hands (2%) by 2024.

In the Fishing industry, the occupation with the largest proportion of employment is Deck and Fishing Hands (53%) followed by Marine Transport Professionals (12%). A small increase in employment is projected for Deck and Fishing Hands (2%) and Marine Transport Professionals (1%) by 2024.

Training trends

Training snapshot

Program enrolments in Aquaculture and Wild Catch-related qualifications have slowly declined each year between 2015 and 2019. Program enrolments peaked in 2015 at around 1,420 and fell to a low of just over 1,000 in 2019. Program completions rose slightly each year between 2015 and 2017, and then declined between 2017 and 2018. Program completions remained steady between 2018 and 2019.

Between 2015 and 2019 the majority of Aquaculture and Wild Catch-related subjects were delivered as part of a nationally recognised program. In 2019, less than 4% of Aquaculture and Wild Catch-related subjects were not delivered as part of a nationally recognised program.

Certificate III level qualifications were the most common in 2019 with almost 490 enrolments, followed by certificate II level qualifications with more than 380 enrolments. There were just less than 20 enrolments in certificate IV level qualifications. Approximately 80% of program enrolments were in Aquaculture qualifications. The majority of students have an intended occupation of Aquaculture Worker.

Private training providers delivered 47% of all training and TAFE institutes delivered 42%. Approximately 88% of subjects were Commonwealth and state funded. Tasmania has the highest proportion of student enrolments with 34%, followed by Western Australia with 23% and South Australia with 10%.

Approximately one third of training was delivered in Tasmania (32%), followed by Western Australia (29%), South Australia (12%), New South Wales (10%), the Northern Territory (9%) and Queensland (8%).

Between 2010 and 2016, apprentice and trainee commencements more than halved, from almost 230 in 2010 to less than 110 in 2016. Commencements rose between 2016 and 2018, and then declined in 2019 to around 120. Although completions have fluctuated between 2010 and 2019, the levels were relatively similar at just over 120 in 2010 and just over 110 in 2019. Completions more than doubled between 2018 and 2019, increasing from 50 in 2018 to over just over 110 in 2019. The most common intended occupation for apprentices and trainees in 2019 was Aquaculture Worker. The majority of apprenticeships and traineeships in 2019 were in Tasmania (83%).

For more data specific to your occupation, industry or training package, visit NCVER’s VET students by industry. If you are prompted to log in, select cancel and you will continue to be directed to the program.

For more data specific to your region visit NCVER’s Atlas of Total VET.

If you are interested in extracting NCVER data to construct tables with data relevant to you, sign up for a VOCSTATS account.

Industry insights

Industry insights on skills needs

The Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast states that the top generic skills for the Aquaculture and Wild Catch industry range from learning agility and information literacy, through to communication and virtual collaboration skills, language, literacy and numeracy (LLN), and managerial and leadership skills. Technology is rated as the fifth most important generic skill for the industry.

The Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC's 2019 Skills Forecast identified a range of significant challenges that impact on the uptake and implementation of industry training, including:

  • Declining and ageing workforce
  • Attracting and recruiting young people
  • Restrictions on visa programs for skilled migration
  • Limited options for subsidised training
  • Geographical and regional dispersion of businesses
  • Limited access to registered training organisations (RTOs)
  • Competing industries
  • Regulation and licensing implications.

The key priority skills identified by the Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC that will require future projects are:

  • Development of the crocodile farming market
  • Increased use of FishTech and Aquabotics in operations
  • Development of partnerships with traditional owners for industry operations
  • Potential development of Indigenous enterprises related to aquaculture and wild catch, including customary fishing.

Crocodile farming is an expanding opportunity in the Northern Territory, Western Australia and Queensland. The challenges of crocodile farming are unique in that it involves one of the world's oldest and most dangerous predators and, while risks may be minimised, there are potentially fatal consequences for both workers and animals. There has been significant growth in crocodile farming and associated markets based on crocodile skins, meat, by-products, tourism and conservation. During 2020, the Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC will oversee the completion of the Crocodile Farming Project and the skills standards for those working with crocodiles.

There are major procedures and technologies emerging for real-time, distant operations in aquaculture, wild catch, fishing and fisheries compliance. Skills and training are needed for workers using remote control centres, cybernated processes and technologically-enhanced equipment. Expansion in the Aquaculture and Wild Catch industry is leading to technologically-advanced medium- and large-sized enterprises with the capacity to evolve their operations further. With the growing potential and decreasing cost of FishTech and Aquabotics, industry operators are expected to increasingly adopt real-time, distant operations and uncrewed vessels and vehicles to enable more efficient monitoring, welfare and biosecurity practices, even in offshore aquaculture and wild catch operations. Many employers are undertaking planning and scoping exercises with a view to introducing these technologies, while some businesses, such as Huon and Tassal in Tasmania, are already using remote centres to control and automate their distant operations.

With this rapid rate of technological change, a new generation of leadership is being developed and traditional occupations and roles are evolving. Technology is now undertaking diverse activities previously completed by workers, including diving operations, on-deck vessel work, harvesting, hatchery and sample collections. Updated workforce training is needed to facilitate the transferable and specialised skills required. During 2020, the Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC will oversee the completion of the FishTech and Aquabotics Project. The project aims to review specific units of competency to ensure that the skills required for an emerging work function, distant operations, are incorporated into existing units or covered in new units. The key drivers for the project include:

  • Changes in technology which improve safety and efficiency
  • Building the Australian Aquaculture and Wild Catch industry in line with broadly-supported strategies, policies and recommendations
  • Enabling smaller operators to introduce new technologies with skilled worker availability
  • Assisting industry in adjusting to changing fish movements and the introduction of new species
  • Maintaining and improving the quality of industry products
  • Ensuring compliance and regulation activities keep up with technological development.

The Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC's 2020 Skills Forecast highlights skill needs around industry leadership and succession planning. Several Seafood Industry Training Package qualifications are intended for job outcomes in leadership and management roles. As the seafood industry has an ageing workforce and is struggling to attract the next generation of workers, the perceived importance of these qualifications will likely be enhanced as succession planning becomes increasingly vital for the continuation of operations. Qualifications such as the Certificate II in Fisheries Compliance Support, Certificate III in Fisheries Compliance, Diploma of Fisheries Compliance and Diploma of Aquaculture are likely to be in higher demand. Part of the emerging need for a new generation of leaders is to ensure that operators keep pace with rapid technological advancements. An accelerating rate of technological change requires greater development of new and more complex skills and knowledge, which is at odds with the current trend of declining formal training delivery.

The Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC's 2020 Skills Forecast outlines the new project for 2020–21: Indigenous Consultation for Annual Updates and Future Projects. It is a research and development project proposed to improve long-term skills outcomes for Indigenous participants in the Australian workforce and the vocational education and training system. The aim is to uncover future projects that could expand productivity, employment and economic development opportunities, open new and emerging markets, improve training and job outcomes and upgrade industry skills in negotiations and partnerships with Indigenous business and community organisations. It will be a joint project, overseen by both the Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC and the Amenity Horticulture, Landscaping, Conservation and Land Management IRC. Both IRCs acknowledge the importance of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander involvement in the development of all aspects of their industries. Aquaculture and wild catch, and conservation and land management are traditional activities of Indigenous communities. Native Title currently covers about 55% of the Australian land and sea mass, and is likely to cover more than 90% within the next three years, providing the opportunity for communities and nations to do business and undertake commercial development and activities. Additionally, there is a critical economic and social need for training and employment that keeps young Indigenous people motivated, engaged and occupied in worthwhile learning and jobs, especially those that can contribute to community wellbeing.

COVID-19 impact

The Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC's 2020 Skills Forecast states that the Aquaculture and Wild Catch industry has been significantly impacted by the various weather, bushfire and pandemic events of the last 12 months. The Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC believes that the recent updating of the Seafood Industry Training Package will provide support over the coming months, both directly through training and by assisting employers to complete analysis of skills. The training package is fully updated and describes modern work processes applicable across the industry. The completion of the current Fishtech and Aquabotics Project will also enhance the capacity for recovery from the current situation, by adding new, and better identifying current, flexibility in training delivery. The Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC expects the current and recent weather, bushfire and pandemic events to give rise to new issues that will need to be addressed.

International seafood markets were shut down as a result of the outbreak of COVID-19, including major markets for Australian exports. The seafood sector was immediately impacted by the pandemic and, in stark contrast to their previous forecast of a 4% rise to $3.3b in 2019–2020, Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES) now predicts that the value of fisheries and aquaculture will fall by 12% ($389 million) to $2.81 billion. The rock lobster industry exports 94% of its produce to China. When demand from the Chinese market collapsed, the sector was destabilised, with the resulting oversupply causing price reductions domestically, especially in Western Australia. Fishers are also being paid less for scallops, prawns and lobsters, with some receiving only two-thirds of what would normally be expected. Industry is turning to local markets in an attempt to sell stock usually reserved for export; however, local sales would potentially only mitigate a small proportion of losses. Unfortunately, there was a concurrent rapid decline in demand from the food service, restaurant and cafe sectors. Dropping demand in the immediate term has seen staff numbers being scaled down at seafood processing facilities and fishing crews out of work.

The report Impacts of COVID-19 on Australian Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Trade, also published by the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES), highlights that there is considerable uncertainty in the outlook for the agricultural, forestry and fisheries sectors with the spread of COVID-19 and that the key aspects that will drive the economic impacts from the pandemic relate to the length of time over which it continues and the measures put in place by governments around the world to limit its spread.

Links and resources

Below is a list of industry-relevant research, organisations and associations. Hyperlinks have been included where available.

Relevant research

Australian Fisheries and Aquaculture Outlook 2020 – Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES)

COVID-19: Impacts on Australia's Food and Agribusiness Sector – KPMG

Impacts of COVID-19 on Australian Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Trade – Jared Greenville, Heather McGilvray, LY Cao and James Fell for the Australian Bureau of Agricultural and Resource Economics and Sciences (ABARES)

NSW Marine Waters Sustainable Aquaculture Strategy – NSW Department of Industry

Tasmania's Sustainable Agri-Food Plan 2019–23 – AgriGrowth Tasmania

 

Industry associations and advisory bodies

Abalone Victoria (Central Zone)

Aqua Association Inc (formerly NSW Aquaculture Association Inc (NSWAqua))

Aquaculture Association of Queensland Inc (AAQ)

Aquaculture Council of Western Australia (ACWA)

Australian Abalone Growers Association (AAGA)

Australian Barramundi Farmers Association (ABFA)

Australian Council of Prawn Fisheries

Australian Freshwater Crayfish Growers Association SA

Australian Freshwater Crayfish Growers Association VIC

Australian Marine Finfish Farmers Association (AMFFA)

Australian Mussel Industry Association (AMIA)

Australian Prawn Farmers Association (APFA)

Australian Southern Bluefin Tuna Industry Association (ASBTIA)

Australian Trout & Salmon Farmers Association

Clarence River Fishermen's Co-operative Ltd (CRFC)

Commonwealth Fisheries Association (CFA)

East Gippsland Estuarine Fishermen's Association

Eastern Victoria Sea Urchin Divers Association

Eastern Zone Abalone Industry Association

Fisheries Research and Development Corporation (FRDC)

Freshwater Native Fish Association (FNFA)

Geraldton Fishermen's Co-operative (GFC)

Great Australian Bight Fishing Industry Association Inc (GABIA)

Moreton Bay Seafood Industry Association (MBSIA)

National Aquaculture Council (NAC)

Northern Prawn Fishery (NPF) Industry Pty Ltd

Northern Territory Seafood Council (NTSC)

NSW Seafood Industry Council

Oysters Australia (OA)

Oysters Tasmania

Pearl Producers Association (PPA)

Port Franklin Fishermen's Association

Portland Professional Fishermen's Association

Professional Fisher’s Association (PFA) (formerly Professional Fishermen's Association)

Queensland Aquaculture Industries Federation Inc (QAIF)

 

Queensland Crayfish Farmers Association Inc (QCFA)

Queensland Seafood Industry Association (QSIA)

Queensland Seafood Marketers Association (QSMA)

Scallop Fishermen’s Association of Tasmania (SFAT)

Seafood Importers Association of Australasia (SIAA)

Seafood Industry Australia (SIA)

Seafood Industry Victoria (SIV)

Seafood Processors and Exporters Council (SPEC)

Small Pelagic Fishery Industry Association Inc (SPFIA)

South Australian Aquaculture Council (SAAC)

South Australian Mussel Growers Association (SAMGA)

South Australian Northern Zone Rock Lobster Fishermen's Association Inc

South Australian Oyster Growers Association (SAOGA)

South East Trawl Fishing Industry Association (SETFIA)

South Eastern Professional Fishermen's Association Inc (SEPFA)

Southern Shark Industry Alliance Inc (SSIA)

Sustainable Shark Fishing Association (SSFAssn)

Tasmanian Abalone Council Ltd

Tasmanian Abalone Growers Association (TAGA)

Tasmanian Salmon Growers Association (TSGA)

Tasmanian Seafood Industry Council (TSIC)

Tasmanian Shellfish Executive Council (TSEC)

The Master Fish Merchants' Association of Australia (MFMA)

Victorian Abalone Growers Association

Victorian Abalone Processors Association

Victorian Abalone Industry Committee (VAIC)

Victorian Bays and Inlet Fisheries Association

Victorian Eel Fishermen’s Association

Victorian Rock Lobster Association

Victorian Scallop Fishermen’s Association Inc

Victorian Trout Farmers Association

Western Abalone Divers Association (WADA)

Western Australian Fishing Industry Council Inc (WAFIC)

Western Rock Lobster (WRL)

Wildcatch Fisheries SA (WFSA)

 

Regulatory bodies

Australian Department of Agriculture, Water and the Environment – Fisheries

Australian Fisheries Management Authority (AFMA)

Australian Maritime Safety Authority (AMSA)

Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority (GBRMPA)

New South Wales Department of Primary Industries – Fishing

Northern Territory Department of Primary Industry and Resources – Fisheries

Primary Industries and Regions SA (PIRSA) – Fisheries and Aquaculture division

Queensland Department of Agriculture and Fisheries

Tasmanian Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment – Sea Fishing and Aquaculture

Victorian Fisheries Authority (VFA)

Western Australia Department of Primary Industries and Regional Development – Fisheries

 

Employee associations

Australian Workers’ Union (AWU)

Maritime Union of Australia (MUA)

United Workers Union

Data sources and notes

Department of Employment 2020, Employment Projections, available from the Labour Market Information Portal

  • by ANZSIC 3 digit industry, employment projections to May 2024
    • 020 Aquaculture
    • 041 Fishing
    • 112 Seafood Processing
       
  • by ANZSCO, selected occupations, employment projections to May 2024
    • Aquaculture Farmers
    • Aquaculture Workers
    • Meat, Poultry and Seafood Process Workers
    • Agricultural Technicians
    • Deck and Fishing Hands
    • Marine Transport Professionals.

 

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2020, Employed persons by industry group of main job (ANZSIC), Sex, State and Territory, November 1984 onwards, 6291.0.55.003 - EQ06, viewed 1 August 2020 https://www.abs.gov.au/AUSSTATS/abs@.nsf/DetailsPage/6291.0.55.003May%202020?OpenDocument

  • Employed total by ANZSIC 3 digit industry, 2000 to 2020, May quarter
    • 020 Aquaculture
    • 041 Fishing
    • 112 Seafood Processing.

 

Australian Bureau of Statistics 2017, 2016 Census – employment, income and unpaid work, TableBuilder. Findings based on use of ABS TableBuilder data.

  • Employment level by 3 digit industry, and 4 digit level occupations to identify the relevant VET-related occupations in the industry as a proportion of the total workforce.
    • 020 Aquaculture
    • 041 Fishing.

 

Training data has been extracted from the National VET Provider Collection, Total VET Students and Courses from the following training package or qualifications:

  • SFI Seafood Industry Training Package
  • Aquaculture
    • SFI10100 - Certificate I in the Seafood Industry (Aquaculture)
    • SFI10104 - Certificate I in Seafood Industry (Aquaculture)
    • SFI10111 - Certificate I in Aquaculture
    • SFI10119 - Certificate I in Seafood Industry
    • SFI20100 - Certificate II in the Seafood Industry (Aquaculture)
    • SFI20104 - Certificate II in Seafood Industry (Aquaculture)
    • SFI20111 - Certificate II in Aquaculture
    • SFI20119 - Certificate II in Aquaculture
    • SFI30100 - Certificate III in the Seafood Industry (Aquaculture)
    • SFI30104 - Certificate III in Seafood Industry (Aquaculture)
    • SFI30111 - Certificate III in Aquaculture
    • SFI30119 - Certificate III in Aquaculture
    • SFI40100 - Certificate IV in the Seafood Industry (Aquaculture)
    • SFI40104 - Certificate IV in Seafood Industry (Aquaculture)
    • SFI40111 - Certificate IV in Aquaculture
    • SFI40119 - Certificate IV in Aquaculture
    • SFI50100 - Diploma of the Seafood Industry (Aquaculture)
    • SFI50104 - Diploma of Seafood Industry (Aquaculture)
    • SFI50111 - Diploma of Aquaculture
    • SFI50119 - Diploma of Aquaculture
  • Other Seafood and Fishing
    • SFI10200 - Certificate I in the Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations)
    • SFI10204 - Certificate I in Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations)
    • SFI10211 - Certificate I in Fishing Operations
    • SFI10500 - Certificate I in the Seafood Industry (Seafood Processing)
    • SFI10504 - Certificate I in Seafood Industry (Seafood Processing)
    • SFI10511 - Certificate I in Seafood Processing
    • SFI20200 - Certificate II in the Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations)
    • SFI20204 - Certificate II in Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations)
    • SFI20211 - Certificate II in Fishing Operations
    • SFI20219 - Certificate II in Fishing Operations
    • SFI20319 - Certificate II in Seafood Post Harvest Operations
    • SFI20404 - Certificate II in Seafood Industry (Fisheries Compliance Support)
    • SFI20411 - Certificate II in Fisheries Compliance Support
    • SFI20419 - Certificate II in Fisheries Compliance Support
    • SFI20500 - Certificate II in the Seafood Industry (Seafood Processing)
    • SFI20504 - Certificate II in Seafood Industry (Seafood Processing)
    • SFI20511 - Certificate II in Seafood Processing
    • SFI20600 - Certificate II in the Seafood Industry (Seafood Sales and Distribution)
    • SFI20604 - Certificate II in Seafood Industry (Seafood Sales and Distribution)
    • SFI20611 - Certificate II in Seafood Industry (Sales and Distribution)
    • SFI30200 - Certificate III in the Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations)
    • SFI30211 - Certificate III in Fishing Operations
    • SFI30219 - Certificate III in Fishing Operations
    • SFI30300 - Certificate III in the Seafood Industry (Fishing Charter Operations)
    • SFI30304 - Certificate III in Seafood Industry (Fishing Charter Operations)
    • SFI30311 - Certificate III in Seafood Industry (Environmental Management Support)
    • SFI30319 - Certificate III in Seafood Post Harvest Operations
    • SFI30400 - Certificate III in the Seafood Industry (Fisheries Compliance)
    • SFI30404 - Certificate III in Seafood Industry (Fisheries Compliance)
    • SFI30411 - Certificate III in Fisheries Compliance
    • SFI30419 - Certificate III in Fisheries Compliance
    • SFI30500 - Certificate III in the Seafood Industry (Seafood Processing)
    • SFI30504 - Certificate III in Seafood Industry (Seafood Processing)
    • SFI30511 - Certificate III in Seafood Processing
    • SFI30600 - Certificate III in the Seafood Industry (Seafood Sales and Distribution)
    • SFI30604 - Certificate III in Seafood Industry (Seafood Sales and Distribution)
    • SFI30611 - Certificate III in Seafood Industry (Sales and Distribution)
    • SFI30699 - Certificate III in the Seafood Industry (Seafood Sales and Distribution)
    • SFI30705 - Certificate III in Seafood Industry (Environmental Management Support)
    • SFI31204 - Certificate III in Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations)
    • SFI32204 - Certificate III in Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations - Marine Engine Driver II)
    • SFI33204 - Certificate III in Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations - Master 5/Skipper 3)
    • SFI40200 - Certificate IV in the Seafood Industries (Fishing Operations)
    • SFI40211 - Certificate IV in Fishing Operations
    • SFI40219 - Certificate IV in Seafood Post Harvest Operations
    • SFI40311 - Certificate IV in Seafood Industry (Environmental Management)
    • SFI40319 - Certificate IV in Fisheries Compliance
    • SFI40400 - Certificate IV in the Seafood Industry (Fisheries Compliance)
    • SFI40404 - Certificate IV in Seafood Industry (Fisheries Compliance)
    • SFI40411 - Certificate IV in Fisheries Compliance
    • SFI40502 - Certificate IV in Seafood Industry (Seafood Processing)
    • SFI40504 - Certificate IV in Seafood Industry (Seafood Processing)
    • SFI40511 - Certificate IV in Seafood Processing
    • SFI40600 - Certificate IV in the Seafood Industry (Seafood Sales and Distribution)
    • SFI40604 - Certificate IV in Seafood Industry (Seafood Sales and Distribution)
    • SFI40611 - Certificate IV in Seafood Industry Sales and Distribution
    • SFI40705 - Certificate IV in Seafood Industry (Environmental Management)
    • SFI41204 - Certificate IV in Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations)
    • SFI42204 - Certificate IV in Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations - Marine Engine Driver I)
    • SFI50200 - Diploma of the Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations)
    • SFI50204 - Diploma of Seafood Industry (Fishing Operations)
    • SFI50211 - Diploma of Fishing Operations
    • SFI50219 - Diploma of Fisheries Compliance
    • SFI50300 - Diploma of the Seafood Industry (Fishing Charter Operations)
    • SFI50304 - Diploma of Seafood Industry (Fishing Charter Operations)
    • SFI50400 - Diploma of the Seafood Industry (Fisheries Compliance)
    • SFI50404 - Diploma of Seafood Industry (Fisheries Compliance)
    • SFI50411 - Diploma of Fisheries Compliance
    • SFI50502 - Diploma of Seafood Industry (Seafood Processing)
    • SFI50504 - Diploma of Seafood Industry (Seafood Processing)
    • SFI50511 - Diploma of Seafood Processing.

This includes superseded qualifications and training packages.

Data covers a range of selected student and training characteristics in the following categories and years:

  • 2015 to 2019 program enrolments
  • 2015 to 2019 subject enrolments
  • 2015 to 2019 program completions.

 

Total VET students and courses data is reported for the calendar year. Program enrolments are the qualifications, courses and skill-sets in which students are enrolled in a given period. For students enrolled in multiple programs, all programs are counted. Program completion indicates that a student has completed a structured and integrated program of education or training. Location data uses student residence. Subject enrolment is registration of a student at a training delivery location for the purpose of undertaking a module, unit of competency or subject. For more information on the terms and definitions, please refer to the Total VET students and courses: terms and definitions document.

Low counts (less than 5) are not reported to protect client confidentiality.

Percentages are rounded to one decimal place. This can lead to situations where the total sum of proportions in a chart may not add up to exactly 100%.

SFI Seafood Industry Training Package apprentice and trainee data has been extracted from the National Apprentice and Trainee Collection, including:

  • 2010 to 2019 commencements
  • 2010 to 2019 completions
  • 2019 apprentices and trainees in-training October to December 2019 collection, by qualification and state and territory of data submitter.

 

Priority skills data have been extracted from the Aquaculture and Wild Catch IRC’s 2019 Skills Forecast.

Updated: 05 Nov 2020
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